[CT Birds] Mallard hybrid

Miley Bull mbull at ctaudubon.org
Fri Mar 23 09:22:43 EDT 2007


Check out this photo of a mallard hybrid for comparison:

http://www.flickr.mud.yahoo.com/photos/sylpics/114470098/in/photostream/


Milan Bull

Milan G. Bull
Senior Director of Science and Conservation
Connecticut Audubon Society
2325 Burr St.
Fairfield, CT 06824
(203) 259-6305 ext. 113
mbull at ctaudubon.org



----- Original Message ----- 
From: <ctbirds-request at lists.ctbirding.org>
To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Sent: Thursday, March 22, 2007 9:38 PM
Subject: CTBirds Digest, Vol 27, Issue 3


> Send CTBirds mailing list submissions to
> ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> ctbirds-request at lists.ctbirding.org
>
> You can reach the person managing the list at
> ctbirds-owner at lists.ctbirding.org
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of CTBirds digest..."
>
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>   1. Re: Bird Thugs (Craig Repasz)
>   2. Small Fox Sparrow (Carrier Graphics)
>   3. EAME, WISN, OSPR, AMOY (Frank Mantlik)
>   4. fox sparrows (RUTH STGERMAINE)
>   5. Brown Creeper/Fox Sparrow cont. (Scott Kruitbosch)
>   6. Wood Ducks - N Stamford (Jim Voros)
>   7. Need Help With Duck ID (Jan Collins)
>   8. Re: Need Help With Duck ID (COMINS, Patrick)
>   9. Re: Need Help With Duck ID (Greg Hanisek)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2007 20:52:30 +0000
> From: Craig Repasz <crepasz at hotmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Bird Thugs
> To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Message-ID: <BAY124-W36A263614EDECE9C7AB7B1A36B0 at phx.gbl>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="Windows-1252"
>
> Scott you are not missing anything. I kept some facts out trying to keep 
> my post to a thumbnail sketch. No smaple size was given n=? That should be 
> in the journal article.
>
> The experiement was done with Prothonatary Warbler nests that had baffles 
> to prevent predation. There was a  group that had the cowbird eggs removed 
> then a front placed on the box that had a hole to small for cowbirds to 
> enter. The eggs were untouched.
>
>
>
>> Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2007 16:41:52 -0400> From: kbosch at gmail.com> To: 
>> ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Bird Thugs> > I 
>> would love to know how big that sample size was - "clearly it is> 
>> retaliation" is an assumption without proof, unless I'm missing 
>> something.> The researchers even stated they did not witness the cowbirds 
>> destroy the> nest/eggs. It could have been a coincidence with many other 
>> species of> birds, or even mammals/snakes, committing the acts. Or maybe 
>> the act of> removing the cowbird eggs from those nests by researchers 
>> caused something> else. Catbirds recognize the eggs, but they do not 
>> suffer this same fate,> correct? In my opinion, I think the simplest 
>> answer of the fact the parents> do not recognize the foreign egg(s) still 
>> sounds good - but I'd love to hear> other thoughts.> > > And speaking of 
>> Bird Thugs - the top thugs, European Starlings, have an even> bigger 
>> bully here - Monk Parakeets. One Starling was trying to eat my suet> 
>> today while a Parakeet was trying to climb onto the cage. It decided it> 
>> couldn't fit on the cage with the Starling, and it couldn't push it off 
>> very> well, so it bit down on the Starling's leg as it held onto the 
>> cage. He flew> off as fast as he could. It's been a week full of pests in 
>> addition to the> rarities.> > Scott Kruitbosch> > On 3/22/07, Craig 
>> Repasz <crepasz at hotmail.com> wrote:> >> > Bird Thugs> >> > >From "Science 
>> News" March 10, 2007 vol. 171> >> > We all know that Brown Headed 
>> Cowbirds parasitize other birds by laying> > their own eggs into the 
>> nests. They then fly off leaving their eggs to be> > incubated by the 
>> parent couple. The fledgling cowbirds usually grow faster> > and out feed 
>> the other chicks. This leaves the parents bird with a big> > demanding 
>> mouth to feed often at the expense of their own brood. One may> > wonder 
>> why the parent birds do not toss the foreign egg out of the nest.> > 
>> Researchers of the Illinois Natural History Survey in Champaign have> > 
>> concluded that Brown Headed Cowbirds will retaliate against a nest if 
>> their> > efforts to parasitize have been undermined.> >> > Researchers 
>> have removed the cowbird eggs from warbler nests to find that> > more of 
>> the warbler eggs were later smashed or carried off (56% destruction)> > 
>> compared to warbler nests that left cowbird eggs in place (6% 
>> destruction.).> > Clearly it is retaliation.> >> > Oddly enough the 
>> researchers did not witness the cowbirds in their> > destructive acts.> 
>>  >> > Nests that had cowbird eggs removed produced 40% as many warblers as 
>> nests> > that kept the cowbird eggs. There is a degree of starvation of 
>> warbler> > chicks in nests that host an interloper, however, nesting 
>> success is still> > higher then nests that were destroyed by retaliating 
>> cowbirds.> >> > Paper to be released in "Proceedings of the National 
>> Academy of Sciences."> >> >> > Personal note: The warblers are forced to 
>> take the lesser of two evils.> > The real problem may be forest de- 
>> fragmentation as a result of urban sprawl> > that creates both the 
>> grass-forest border habitat that is ideal for cowbirds> > and splinters 
>> the warbler's breeding habitat.> >> >> > 
>> _________________________________________________________________> > Your 
>> friends are close to you.Keep them that way.> > 
>> http://spaces.live.com/signup.aspx> > 
>> _______________________________________________> > This list is provided 
>> by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA)> > for the discussion 
>> of birds and birding in Connecticut.> > For subscription information 
>> visit> > 
>> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org> 
>>  >> > > > -- > Scott Kruitbosch> Stratford, CT> kbosch at gmail.com> 
>> _______________________________________________> This list is provided by 
>> the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of 
>> birds and birding in Connecticut. > For subscription information visit 
>> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
> _________________________________________________________________
> Live Search Maps ? find all the local information you need, right when you 
> need it.
> http://maps.live.com/?icid=wlmtag2&FOR M=MGAC01
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2007 15:02:45 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Carrier Graphics <carriergraphics at sbcglobal.net>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Small Fox Sparrow
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Message-ID: <65718.11848.qm at web81808.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
>
> From: Paul Carrier;
>
> Well it's back! This Foxy is again looking noticably smaller than the 
> other Fox Sparrows, being
> much closer in size to the Song Sparrow it feeds with then its own kind.
>
> I looked up in "Sparrows and Buntings" and got some clues.
>
> Av length: 18 cm - but this covers all races.
> Refering to Fox Sparrows: "All races are large and stocky."
>
> note: this small Fox Sp does look a bit stockier than the song, but 
> defenately not longer in tail
> or overall length as the other Fox Sparrows do.
>
> measurements: Northern and Eastern group -(iliaca)
>
> Max wing male:   92 mm
> Min wing female: 81 mm -  thats an 11 mm difference -
>
> Max tail male:    73.9 mm
> Min tail female: 66.8 mm - thats a 7 mm difference -
>
> The question is: can these extream  (within the (iliaca) race) 
> measurements of a small female
> compared to a large male, show a noticable size difference in Fox Sparrows 
> to the human eye? It
> sure seems so from my perspective here at my feeder.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2007 15:06:27 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Frank Mantlik <mantlik at sbcglobal.net>
> Subject: [CT Birds] EAME, WISN, OSPR, AMOY
> To: Birds CT <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Message-ID: <20070322220627.24226.qmail at web82104.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
>
>>From Frank Mantlik
> 3/22 Westport, Sherwood Is. S.P. - 2 EASTERN
> MEADOWLARKS, foraging with 20 KILLDEER at model
> airplane field/marsh
> Westport, Nyala Farm - 3 WILSON'S SNIPE
> Milford, Milford Point (as viewed from across river in
> Stratford) - 2 OSPREYS, 5 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS
> Echoing Charlie Barnard, I saw no sizeable flocks of
> gulls anywhere along the Westport or Stratford coasts.
> Saw only 4 BONAPARTE'S GULLS at the mouth of Sasco
> Creek (Southport Beach).
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2007 15:11:47 -0700 (PDT)
> From: RUTH STGERMAINE <rstgermaine at sbcglobal.net>
> Subject: [CT Birds] fox sparrows
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Message-ID: <756862.76187.qm at web81511.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
>
> Hi everyone, i had 7 fox sparrows yesturday. also i know someone mentioned 
> seeing a bird stand on one leg, 1 of the fox s. did it. i happend to be 
> looking out my window in my room and he or she was feeding and then hopped 
> and then did the 1 foot pose very interesting, i don't recall seeing that 
> before, i am going to start paying more attention,  between the song 
> sparrows singing and the fox sparrows and white throated singing it was a 
> very musical morning here on 3-21-07. i just love spring..
>
>
> Lisa Dworak
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2007 19:02:34 -0400
> From: "Scott Kruitbosch" <kbosch at gmail.com>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Brown Creeper/Fox Sparrow cont.
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Message-ID:
> <f1cf01110703221602t6ca33683h49b3e7fb25e2b5d8 at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
>
>>From Scott Kruitbosch:
> 3/22 - Stratford yard - 1 BROWN CREEPER
>
>
> I also had 2 Fox Sparrows here at 8:30AM and around 6:00PM.
>
>
> I spotted the Brown Creeper on one of the trees around my feeders at about
> 5:30PM, the third of the winter for me. It did not try to eat anything
> provided and kept foraging on the trees. When I was a young boy, 10-15 
> years
> ago, I would see Brown Creepers on our trees all the time. They were one 
> of
> my favorites. We have a row of trees spaced a few feet apart and it would
> spiral around them and fly to the next at the bottom, right at my short 
> eye
> level. I didn't know they all did this at the time, but it made it easy to
> see them whenever I was outside playing. It's the bird I always think of
> when I hear about declining species. I'm not missing them; they just 
> aren't
> there anymore.
>
>
> -- 
> Scott Kruitbosch
> Stratford, CT
> kbosch at gmail.com
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2007 16:19:03 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Jim Voros <voros at sbcglobal.net>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Wood Ducks - N Stamford
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Message-ID: <746300.54716.qm at web83409.mail.sp1.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
>
> Backyard pond had 4 male wood ducks, 1 female. First for the season.
> Also, first time for Common Merganser pair in the backyard (ever).
> Hooded Mergansers have been here all winter though.
>
> North Stamford
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2007 20:06:24 -0400
> From: "Jan Collins" <jgcollins at cox.net>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Need Help With Duck ID
> To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Message-ID: <001f01c76ce0$f4fa58b0$0200a8c0 at JanToshiba>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Spent a couple nice hours today at Station 43 in South Windsor enjoying 
> all the ducks:  mallard,blackduck,wooduck,ringnecked,greenwing teal,common 
> and hooded mergs as well as observing the great horned owl and bald eagle 
> on their respective nests.  On the way home to Somers stopped at the Mill 
> Pond in Broad Brook to check out more ducks and saw one in with the 
> mallards that had a green head but a white chest.  Looked in the book to 
> confirm a northern shoveler but a couple things didn't look quite right. 
> The duck was slightly larger than the mallards (book says they are 
> smaller) had a green head but an orange/yellow bill instead of dark (even 
> with the scope he was pretty far away to see if the bill was really shovel 
> shape) and his body was pretty dark (no sign of rusty sides) with a hint 
> of white perhaps along the wing edges (I didn't see him fly though).  My 
> first thought was he was a hybrid of a mallard and something else because 
> I couldn't quite convince myself he was a shoveler.
> Any thoughts anyone?
>
> Jan
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2007 21:08:17 -0400
> From: "COMINS, Patrick" <PCOMINS at audubon.org>
> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Need Help With Duck ID
> To: "Jan Collins" <jgcollins at cox.net>, <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Message-ID:
> <072251767F8FF84EA470EF2901FBFA7E7F2006 at swift.int.audubon.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
> Shovelers are pretty much shovelers.  Milford Point, or rather Wheeler 
> Marsh, is a great place for them, but if it wasn't quite right, it 
> probably wasn't a shoveler.  Mallards and waterfowl in general do a lot of 
> hybridizing.  It can get especially tricky with some of the funky domestic 
> Mallard races and hybrids thereof.   With few exceptions, any duck in our 
> area larger than a Mallard is likely to have some degree of domestic 
> origin (unless it is an eider, but they are pretty recognizable too).
>
>
> Patrick
>
>
>
> -----Original Message----- 
> From: ctbirds-bounces at lists.ctbirding.org on behalf of Jan Collins
> Sent: Thu 3/22/2007 8:06 PM
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Cc:
> Subject: [CT Birds] Need Help With Duck ID
>
>
>
> Spent a couple nice hours today at Station 43 in South Windsor enjoying 
> all the ducks:  mallard,blackduck,wooduck,ringnecked,greenwing teal,common 
> and hooded mergs as well as observing the great horned owl and bald eagle 
> on their respective nests.  On the way home to Somers stopped at the Mill 
> Pond in Broad Brook to check out more ducks and saw one in with the 
> mallards that had a green head but a white chest.  Looked in the book to 
> confirm a northern shoveler but a couple things didn't look quite right. 
> The duck was slightly larger than the mallards (book says they are 
> smaller) had a green head but an orange/yellow bill instead of dark (even 
> with the scope he was pretty far away to see if the bill was really shovel 
> shape) and his body was pretty dark (no sign of rusty sides) with a hint 
> of white perhaps along the wing edges (I didn't see him fly though).  My 
> first thought was he was a hybrid of a mallard and something else because 
> I couldn't quite convince myself he was a shoveler.
> Any thoughts anyone?
>
> Jan
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) 
> for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit 
> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2007 21:37:57 -0400
> From: "Greg Hanisek" <ghanisek at rep-am.com>
> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Need Help With Duck ID
> To: "Jan Collins" <jgcollins at cox.net>
> Cc: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Message-ID: <003001c76ceb$e28cc860$8902a8c0 at internal.repam.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
> reply-type=original
>
> Waterfowl are noted for readily hybridizing, but mallards especially are
> also noted for breeding with various domestic types. The one you describe 
> is
> fairly typical of hybrids that appear to involve a mallard and some sort 
> of
> white domestic duck. The big, heavy look is a good clue in addition to
> plumage that doesn't quite fit for any wild duck. The big heavy look also
> helps for zeroing in on barnyard geese that have plumage reminiscent of a
> wild speces, such as Greater White-fronted Goose.
>
> Greg Hanisek
> Waterbury
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Jan Collins" <jgcollins at cox.net>
> To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Sent: Thursday, March 22, 2007 8:06 PM
> Subject: [CT Birds] Need Help With Duck ID
>
>
>> Spent a couple nice hours today at Station 43 in South Windsor enjoying
>> all the ducks:  mallard,blackduck,wooduck,ringnecked,greenwing 
>> teal,common
>> and hooded mergs as well as observing the great horned owl and bald eagle
>> on their respective nests.  On the way home to Somers stopped at the Mill
>> Pond in Broad Brook to check out more ducks and saw one in with the
>> mallards that had a green head but a white chest.  Looked in the book to
>> confirm a northern shoveler but a couple things didn't look quite right.
>> The duck was slightly larger than the mallards (book says they are
>> smaller) had a green head but an orange/yellow bill instead of dark (even
>> with the scope he was pretty far away to see if the bill was really 
>> shovel
>> shape) and his body was pretty dark (no sign of rusty sides) with a hint
>> of white perhaps along the wing edges (I didn't see him fly though).  My
>> first thought was he was a hybrid of a mallard and something else because
>> I couldn't quite convince myself he was a shoveler.
>> Any thoughts anyone?
>>
>> Jan
>> _______________________________________________
>> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA)
>> for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
>> For subscription information visit
>> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) 
> for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit 
> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>
> End of CTBirds Digest, Vol 27, Issue 3
> **************************************
> 





More information about the CTBirds mailing list