[CT Birds] CTBirds Digest, Vol 1105, Issue 1

lisagagnon37 at yahoo.com lisagagnon37 at yahoo.com
Sat Mar 6 13:08:58 EST 2010


In regards to birding by ear. I to started young listening to birds. My mom said I use to talk to them anyways that's how I identified a Carolina wren. After hearing @ my old place for a while I dragged myself out of bed to find it @ 6 am after working 2nd shift. Lisa. 
Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

-----Original Message-----
From: ctbirds-request at lists.ctbirding.org
Date: Sat, 06 Mar 2010 12:00:04 
To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Subject: CTBirds Digest, Vol 1105, Issue 1

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Today's Topics:

   1. Want to learn more about eBird? Come to the HAS meeting	on
      Tuesday! (Zagorski, Sara)
   2. Coastal Stratford (Chasbarnard at aol.com)
   3. Listening (Roy Harvey)
   4. On This Date (4/6) (Dennis Varza)
   5. Towhee x 3 (Brian Webster)
   6. GREAT POND (Jeremy F)
   7. Re: Listening (Julie Keefer)
   8. Barrow's pair (Nick Bonomo)


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Message: 1
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2010 13:52:45 -0500
From: "Zagorski, Sara" <szagorski at daypitney.com>
To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Subject: [CT Birds] Want to learn more about eBird? Come to the HAS
	meeting	on Tuesday!
Message-ID:
	<7499C9123EEFED4B97CA7D037608A23A01E3471C at DPMAIL01.dpllp.law>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="us-ascii"

On Tuesday, March 9, the Hartford Audubon Society will be having its
monthly meeting with featured speaker Marshall Iliff, former VENT leader
and now eBird  Project Leader for the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.
Marshall's talk is entitled "Make Your Birds Count or eBird - How and
Why to Use It." Have you thought about using eBird but don't know how to
start? Or have you been using eBird but want to know how to hide
sensitive bird sightings or create life lists for yourself? Then this is
your opportunity to ask the expert any questions you might have, and
also understand the value of eBird to the world birding community.
Social time if from 7:00 - 7:30 pm, and Marshall will start his program
at 7:30 pm. A business meeting will follow after his talk. 

The meeting is held at St. James Episcopal Church, 1018 Farmington Ave,
West Hartford. All are welcome to attend.

Sara Zagorski
Wethersfield






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------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2010 17:33:53 EST
From: Chasbarnard at aol.com
To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: [CT Birds] Coastal Stratford
Message-ID: <29a4c.25bfab1d.38c2e0d1 at aol.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

I happened upon Buzz Devine at Long Beach in Stratford at about 12:45 this  
afternoon and we birded along coastal Stratford until about 3 PM. A few of 
the  sightings are as follows:
 
Glaucous Gull at Long Beach - There were a few hundred Herring and  
Ring-billed Gulls near shore, feeding upon plankton in the water.
 
Common Goldeneye - Buzz estimated at least 2000 off of  Stratford Point. It 
was one of the largest congregations of Common Goldeneye  which I have ever 
seen in Connecticut. They were far out and a scope was  definitely needed.  
 
Surf Scoter (1) -The huge flock of scoter (sp.), which Twan Leenders  
recently estimated at 6000 birds,  was nowhere to be seen. Things change  from 
day to day now. 
 
Canvasback (29) - Frash Pond
 
We saw only 1 Common Loon off of the point and no Horned Grebes at all.  
Nearby,off of Fairfield, Horned Grebes have been very numerous, with some 
recent  counts in the 40's near Penfield Reef.
 
American Coot (7) - Birdseye Street boat ramp area. Also a Pied-billed  
Grebe there.
 
Snow Bunting (2) - Stratford Point
 
Charlie Barnard
Stratford
 
 
 
 


------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Fri, 5 Mar 2010 20:26:09 -0800 (PST)
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey at snet.net>
To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: [CT Birds] Listening
Message-ID: <608267.58902.qm at web81505.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Birding by ear is probably the most important skill that separates the beginner from the more experienced birder.  For those who have not taken this step yet, I encourage you to start.  You can not imagine how much it expands your birding horizons until you experience it.

March is a great time to get started.  The variety of birds is still pretty limited, and they all seem to be singing their hearts out.  In a month or two there will be many times more species to sort out, but right now it is not as complicated.

It is not a skill most of us pick up quickly.  I spent years learning the easier and common birds, in many cases re-learning the same ones the each year.  Eventually, season by season, even I found I was recognizing a lot though I am far from expert at this.  It is also something you never finish mastering, there is always more to learn.  It becomes especially interesting when I encounter a song I do not recognize!  Today I followed an unfamiliar three-note song and found a mixed flock of titmice, chickadees, nutchatches, Golden-crowned Kinglets and Brown Creepers.  That song stopped so I never did identify the singer.  Then another unfamiliar song started, a short rising trill, but I never managed to sort out who it was coming from.  (Playing recordings later shed no more light on the question.)  So a little attention to songs turned a quite morning of birding with "just the usual birds" into an intriguing (though unsolved) puzzle.

Roy Harvey
Beacon Falls, CT



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Sat, 06 Mar 2010 06:42:36 -0500
From: Dennis Varza <dennisvz at optonline.net>
To: Posting Bird List <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>,	Susan Hochgraf
	<susan.hochgraf at uconn.edu>,	Jorge de Leon
	<ornithology.library at yale.edu>
Subject: [CT Birds] On This Date (4/6)
Message-ID: <AD536847-2B95-4A1A-90A9-E2D306D643FC at optonline.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed

1876	Hooded Merganser	Portland
1890	Evening Grosbeak	Portland/Middletown/East Hampton
1935	Orange-crowned Warbler	Greeneich, Todd's Neck
1951	40 Field Sparrow New Haven
1954	50 Fox Sparrow	Hartford
1989	Northern Lapwing	Mansfield
1995	3600 Red-winged Blackbird	Westport, Sherwood Is. St. Pk.




------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Sat, 6 Mar 2010 06:54:54 -0500
From: Brian Webster <b.webster at hotmail.com>
To: CT Birding <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Subject: [CT Birds] Towhee x 3
Message-ID: <SNT136-w7DDC342483A65528EB969E3370 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"


3/6, Stratford yard/woods @ (6:35a)-

 

(3) Eastern Towhees scratching around the wood edges behind my dumpsters in the condos.  

 

I pulled in after getting smokes and brew, and heard the complete Towhee song!  For the lasdt week or so (posted about it a whlie ago) I've been hearing the 'EAST-ern' .... or  'DRINK-your' parts, but until this morning I didn't get the whole phrase...  'EAST-ern, tow-HEEHEEEEEEEE'....   or   'DRINK-your-TEEEAAAA'.

 

 

Two of the Towhees were male, one female.  I wonder if its the breeding pair, or one of them or offspring, I watched last summer.  Do they always pick such impossible and impassible sections of woods??  These did last year.  It was in a crotch of a tree, filled with hangy moss and leaves and sticks, inside a thorn bush, inside a thicket, inside the woods.  Great real-estate!

 

 

Brian Webster

Stratford, CT

B.webster at hotmail.com

http://thebirdmojo.blogspot.com/
 		 	   		  
_________________________________________________________________
Hotmail: Free, trusted and rich email service.
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------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Sat, 6 Mar 2010 05:53:41 -0800 (PST)
From: Jeremy F <ecobirding at yahoo.com>
To: CTBirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: [CT Birds] GREAT POND
Message-ID: <406033.68187.qm at web63602.mail.re1.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Hi everyone
I was wondering if anyone knows if great pond in Simsbury is snow free? Also, if the gate is unlocked during day light hours yet?
thanks for your help
jeremy faucher
enfield

------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Sat, 6 Mar 2010 10:01:19 -0500
From: "Julie Keefer" <julie.keefer at gmail.com>
To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Listening
Message-ID: <4b926e4c.02c3f10a.1b12.ffffe5bb at mx.google.com>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="us-ascii"

I totally agree that learning the skill greatly expands your birding
horizons and it definitely makes a good birder better.  My dad has over 1300
birds on his life list and is a very good birder but his birding by ear
skills are horrible! :)  He just doesn't have the ear for it and I think he
is proud of me for learning it since he was the one who taught me to bird
and got me interested when I was younger.  I think he is a bit jealous too
when we go birding together and I rattle off what we are hearing!  I have a
long way to go though before I've seen as many birds as he has! 

On another note, my brother's daughter loves birds so I sent her a CD for
her 2nd birthday last year and now even she can identify about 10 of the
common birds they have in their yard by sound!  It amazes me someone so
young can identify birds as well as she can.  My brother never really got
into birding like I have but now he is becoming much more interested in it
as he birds with his daughter.

I decided to learn to bird by ear several years ago because it always
frustrated me to hear a bird singing and never be able to find it to
identify it.  I bought some CDs and listened to them over and over.  I was
amazed at how many birds I was missing just in my own backyard!!  The
Ovenbird was the first lifer I identified by sound.  I had no idea we had
Ovenbirds breeding in the woods around our house (this was in Raleigh, NC).
I think I must have always mistaken them for Carolina Wrens because I wasn't
listening carefully enough.  I even discovered we had Yellow-billed Cuckoos
in those woods though I never saw one in the yard (though I saw plenty
nearby at the lake).  It was amazing and I still look forward to spring and
listening for the birds to arrive!

Anyway, it is a great skill to try to learn and simply listening in your
backyard is a great way to start!

Roy, my guess is that 3-noted song you heard may have been a titmouse.  They
continue to amaze me with the variety of songs they have!  Not sure what was
making that trill!  Pine Siskins have a rising trill and Juncos trill but I
would not describe it as rising.  And I doubt there are any warblers around
yet!  Good luck with your mystery.  It is one of the things that makes
birding so much fun!!

Julie Keefer
Lyme

-----Original Message-----
From: ctbirds-bounces at lists.ctbirding.org
[mailto:ctbirds-bounces at lists.ctbirding.org] On Behalf Of Roy Harvey
Sent: Friday, March 05, 2010 11:26 PM
To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: [CT Birds] Listening

Birding by ear is probably the most important skill that separates the
beginner from the more experienced birder.  For those who have not taken
this step yet, I encourage you to start.  You can not imagine how much it
expands your birding horizons until you experience it.

March is a great time to get started.  The variety of birds is still pretty
limited, and they all seem to be singing their hearts out.  In a month or
two there will be many times more species to sort out, but right now it is
not as complicated.

It is not a skill most of us pick up quickly.  I spent years learning the
easier and common birds, in many cases re-learning the same ones the each
year.  Eventually, season by season, even I found I was recognizing a lot
though I am far from expert at this.  It is also something you never finish
mastering, there is always more to learn.  It becomes especially interesting
when I encounter a song I do not recognize!  Today I followed an unfamiliar
three-note song and found a mixed flock of titmice, chickadees, nutchatches,
Golden-crowned Kinglets and Brown Creepers.  That song stopped so I never
did identify the singer.  Then another unfamiliar song started, a short
rising trill, but I never managed to sort out who it was coming from.
(Playing recordings later shed no more light on the question.)  So a little
attention to songs turned a quite morning of birding with "just the usual
birds" into an intriguing (though unsolved) puzzle.

Roy Harvey
Beacon Falls, CT

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This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA)
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------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Sat, 6 Mar 2010 11:08:55 -0500
From: Nick Bonomo <nbonomo at gmail.com>
To: CTBirds <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Subject: [CT Birds] Barrow's pair
Message-ID: <CAFBBA69-DFF9-4977-A0B2-34CB417498EB at gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset=us-ascii;	format=flowed;	delsp=yes

Luke Tiller reports a pair of Barrow's Goldeneye, male and female, off  
the east side of Penfield Reef.

Nick Bonomo

Sent from my iPhone



------------------------------

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This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org

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