[CT Birds] Trumpeter Swans (LONG)

Dennis Varza dennisvz at optonline.net
Mon Mar 29 23:54:52 EDT 2010


How about a negative proof of acceptance.?
If you wanted to exterminate the species, would it be possible?

If no it is established.

D.

On Mar 29, 2010, at 11:31 PM, Mark Szantyr wrote:

>
>
> I have copied the text from the ARCC report dealing with Monk  
> Parakeets acceptance to the state list.  It sheds a bit of light on  
> the process and criteria needed to establish an "exotic" bird on  
> the state list.
>
>
>
> Mark
>
> MONK PARAKEET (Myiopsitta monachus). This species is accepted to  
> the state list based on a population that seems to have grown from  
> a core group established in Fairfield county since the early 1970s  
> (L. Pearson in litt.). The species now nests at numerous localities  
> along the coast from Darien to West Haven and inland to Danbury.  
> The total statewide population is around 400 individuals today, but  
> the exact number is very hard to determine due to the nomadic  
> nature of this species. The population is increasing and new  
> nesting colonies are being found regularly. The population of Monk  
> Parakeets in Connecticut appears to meet all of the criteria for  
> introduced species established in the ABA Checklist fourth edition  
> (DeBenedictis et al. 1990)-a more-or-less contiguous population  
> exists that survives normal mortality and nest failure, produces  
> offspring that maintains or increases the population level, and is  
> not directly dependent on human support.
>
> The American Birding Association (ABA) recently added this species  
> to its checklist of North American birds based on populations in  
> Florida and Texas (Birding 26:96). In that report, the ABA  
> checklist committee questioned the status of other populations,  
> including those in New England, stating that they were sustained by  
> human assistance, e.g. feeding. The Connecticut committee disagrees  
> with that opinion, citing a careful review of this species in  
> Connecticut by Olivieri and Pearson (1992), who indicate that Monk  
> Parakeets are thriving and expanding here and are not dependent on  
> humans for food any more than are, for example, Northern Cardinal  
> or House Finch, which in New England are both comparatively  
> recently established breeders that probably took advantage of bird  
> feeders to survive winters. While bird seed is the predominate food  
> in winter, these parrots have been seen feeding on frozen fruits,  
> plant buds, and grass in winter. The diet and breeding times are  
> similar to those reported for a colony near Chicago (Hyman and  
> Pruett-Jones 1995). Juveniles are first seen in Connecticut  
> colonies usually in July. Monk Parakeets apparently survived  
> eradication efforts in Connecticut in the early to mid-1970s. A  
> comparison of the numbers reported by Niedermyer and Hickey (1977)  
> with those in Olivieri and Pearson (1992) for the early 1970s shows  
> that the Connecticut population was likely underestimated in those  
> years as reported in the earlier study.
>
> While the committee is uneasy with a generalization that this  
> species is now "officially established," members agree that the  
> Connecticut population is similar to other populations in the  
> United States. In some ways, the Monk Parakeet is probably more  
> self-sustaining in the state than are Bobwhite and Ring-necked  
> Pheasant, which rely on restocking in parts of their range within  
> the state. Further study is needed on population growth and diet of  
> the Monk Parakeet in Connecticut.
>
> Mark S. Szantyr
> 80 Bicknell Road #9
> Ashford, Connecticut 06278
> 860-487-9766
> Birddog55 at charter.net
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Mark Szantyr"  
> <birddog55 at charter.net>
> To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Sent: Monday, March 29, 2010 11:23 PM
> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Trumpeter Swans-YES
>
>
>> For interesting reading about the "natural" range of Trumpeter  
>> Swans and the introduction / re-introduction program, The Birds of  
>> North America monograph by Cornell has a lot of interesting stuff  
>> to consider. Interestingly, just a few days ago, and before these  
>> swans were found,  I was in a conversation with a notable western  
>> waterfowl guy and he was going off about what he termed, "the  
>> farce" of reintoducing a bird like the Trumpeter Swan to an area  
>> where they may not have actually occurred....Birding is soooooo  
>> much fun!
>>
>> Mark
>> Mark S. Szantyr
>> 80 Bicknell Road #9
>> Ashford, Connecticut 06278
>> 860-487-9766
>> Birddog55 at charter.net
>>
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>
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association  
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