[CT Birds] Ashford, Boston Hollow, and sound files

Mntncougar at aol.com Mntncougar at aol.com
Thu Jul 8 16:18:43 EDT 2010


Eastford, Rt 44 Osprey nest:

I am sorry to report that the nest has apparently failed this year. I  
stopped there a couple of weeks ago and there was 1 adult on the nest calling,  
but no sign of any chicks in the nest (there had been three). I was by the 
road,  looking the nest with my scope, but very strangely, the adult took off 
and  headed right for me, calling. It hovered over or near me calling 
loudly for  several minutes, then flew back near the nest, but landed on a snag. 
I had never  gotten that reaction - or any reaction to my presence - from 
those birds before.  I believe the bird was probably the male. At that point I 
left. Yesterday I  checked again, and as I suspected the nest was deserted. 
Incidentally, the  Great Blue Heron nests were all empty 2 weeks ago, and I 
have been seeing a lot  of very young looking juvies around.
 
Boston Hollow report:
More info and some sound files on my blog, (  
_http://birdingnect.blogspot.com/_ (http://birdingnect.blogspot.com/)    ), but here (below) is a list of 
the birds i have seen and heard in the last 2  days.  Things have gotten a 
lot quieter now, but still a lot of birds  around and several species still 
singing.  On Monday, June 28, there were  still several singing Canada 
Warblers around.  I have not seen or heard a  one since that date.  After a 
month's absence, the two adult Common Ravens  returned yesterday, and made their 
presence well known, calling from all corners  of the forest (and right over 
the road as well - recordings on blog).   Also, I had my first Boston 
Hollow BROWN CREEPER yesterday, at last.   1st  Great Crested Flycatcher in quite 
a while, also.  There are a lot  of very young fledgling songbirds around 
now.
Location:      Boston Hollow/Barlow Mill
Observation date:      7/7/10
Notes:     Cumulative list for June 6 and 7,  2010
Brown Creeper was a first for me in Boston Hollow.  First time I  have seen 
or heard the ravens since the day I saw the adults with a fledgling.  
Today, however, 2 (the adults?) were all over the area, both seen and heard,  
very vocal.  
Number of species:     52

Turkey  Vulture     6
Broad-winged Hawk      1
Mourning Dove     4
Yellow-billed Cuckoo   1
Red-bellied Woodpecker     1
Yellow-bellied  Sapsucker     2
Downy Woodpecker     4
Hairy  Woodpecker     2
Eastern Wood-Pewee      6
Eastern Phoebe     5
Great Crested Flycatcher   1
Eastern Kingbird     1
Blue-headed  Vireo     4
Warbling Vireo     2
Red-eyed  Vireo     6
Blue Jay     8
American  Crow     2
Common Raven     2
Tree  Swallow     4
Black-capped Chickadee      12
Tufted Titmouse     8
White-breasted Nuthatch   4
Brown Creeper     1
Winter Wren   1
Veery     6
Hermit Thrush      6
Wood Thrush     4
American Robin      12
Gray Catbird     8
Cedar Waxwing      3
Yellow Warbler     4
Chestnut-sided Warbler   1
Magnolia Warbler     2
Black-throated Blue  Warbler     5
Yellow-rumped Warbler      2
Black-throated Green Warbler     10
Blackburnian  Warbler     1
Pine Warbler      2
Black-and-white Warbler     4
Ovenbird      8
Louisiana Waterthrush     4
Common Yellowthroat   10
Eastern Towhee     6
Chipping Sparrow   8
Song Sparrow     6
Scarlet Tanager   2
Northern Cardinal     2
Red-winged  Blackbird     2
Common Grackle      2
Brown-headed Cowbird     2
Baltimore Oriole   1
American Goldfinch     6
 
Most of those numbers are estimates, and most of them are  probably very low
 
Here's a sound file of a bird I'm not sure about.  I think  it may be a 
Common Yellowthroat, it was in a brushy, marshy area, and very  loud.  It is 
certainly not a standard song though.
 
_http://www.4shared.com/audio/UZtSqkkF/UKN_bird_1.html_ 
(http://www.4shared.com/audio/UZtSqkkF/UKN_bird_1.html) 
 
http://www.4shared.com/audio/UZtSqkkF/UKN_bird_1.html
 
Don't forget to check out my blog, Ill be updating it  shortly.  
_http://birdingnect.blogspot.com/_ (http://birdingnect.blogspot.com/) 
 
Don Morgan
Coventry




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