[CT Birds] feed or not to feed?

jaybrd49 at aol.com jaybrd49 at aol.com
Tue Sep 14 14:03:21 EDT 2010


 The pros and cons of bird feeding would be an excellent subject for a future COA annual meeting topic. Research has shown that a majority of species do not depend upon backyard feeding stations even during the harsh winter months.
However, it is hard to believe that if everyone shut down their feeders in mid-winter, there would not be an adverse effect for many of our winter residents.  There is no question that people put up feeders because they enjoy seeing birds up-close in their yards, often from the comfort of a big window (concern about window strikes has been another thread lately). It is also likely that the proliferation of bird feeding stations has, to some degree, influenced bird populations here in Connecticut (cardinal and tufted titmouse come readily to mind as these species were not found at these latitudes in the first half of the twentieth century, not to mention the more recent influx of red-bellied woodpecker and Carolina wren).  Unfortunately, as Paul Carrier mentions, drawing large concentrations of birds to a small area does have its negative side, and I am not talking about the presence of sharp-shinned and Cooper's hawks that frequent backyard feeders. A West Hartford resident has already counted 8 dead blue jays in his yard this month. Although the birds have not been tested, it is a well-known fact that increasing concentrations of birds can spread disease. Perhaps some readers remember the comments about damp niger seed breeding lethal bacteria expressed here last winter.  This was a particular concern for goldfinches at feeders. Botulism in ducks is another example.

So, who wants to prepare that program?

Jay Kaplan
Canton

 


 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: LaFleur, Roger <rlafleur at crec.org>
To: Carrier Graphics <carriergraphics at sbcglobal.net>; ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Sent: Tue, Sep 14, 2010 10:58 am
Subject: Re: [CT Birds] feed or not to feed?


All birds could use some assistance when it comes to finding food, looks
like your feeders are multi-tasking.

Roger

-----Original Message-----
From: ctbirds-bounces at lists.ctbirding.org
[mailto:ctbirds-bounces at lists.ctbirding.org] On Behalf Of Carrier
Graphics
Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2010 11:42 AM
To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: [CT Birds] feed or not to feed?

To feed birds or not is the question.

I have a bird feeder up and filled throughout the year, but that old
question 
comes up for me once again.....

Is it a good idea to attract birds to feeders even though it condenses
their 
numbers and makes these birds
more vulnerable to predator attacks? I have been told by experts (those
who 
should know) that it 

most likely is a wash. 

All summer, I have had a hanging feeder on my cedar tree filled and
visited 
greatly from the bird population
within my area. Even a red squirrel visits daily. However: I also have a

resident Coopers Hawk about, and 

this hawk has had fantastic luck catching M Doves and others such as
Blue jays 
under the feeder. 

How do i know? because he leaves many of their scattered breast and
flight 
feathers behind. So far this
 summer i have found over 6 Dove and 2 Jay feather piles under the
feeder.  

Are we helping or hindering our bird friends by feeding them? i would
love to 
hear how others feel about this 

subject and what they might know about it as well for all of us to learn
from.

Thanks - Paul Carrier
_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association
(COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit
http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org



The documents accompanying this fax or e-mail transmission, including any 
attachments, are for the sole use of the intended recipients and MAY contain 
confidential health or other information that is legally privileged.  The 
authorized recipient of this information is prohibited from disclosing this 
information to any other party unless required to do so by law or regulation and 
is required to destroy the information after its stated need has been fulfilled.

If you are NOT the intended recipient you are hereby notified that ANY 
disclosure, copying, distribution or action taken in reliance on the contents of 
these documents is strictly prohibited. If you have received this information 
via facsimile in error, please notify the sender immediately and arrange for the 
return or destruction of these documents. If information is received via e-mail 
and you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by e-mail 
immediately and delete/destroy both the original and the reply e-mail message.

_______________________________________________
This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for 
the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org

 



More information about the CTBirds mailing list