[CT Birds] CTBirds Digest, Vol 1912, Issue 3

Marilyn Virts mvirts at att.net
Wed May 23 09:22:35 EDT 2012


I was told recently by an employee at  Hammonasset that the openings are 
there but are small to keep out House Sparrows.  The boxes are being used. 
M Virts
----- Original Message ----- 
From: <ctbirds-request at lists.ctbirding.org>
To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2012 9:37 PM
Subject: CTBirds Digest, Vol 1912, Issue 3


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> ***  When replying to this message please trim off the unrelated portions 
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> Today's Topics:
>
>   1. Re: wind turbines and birds (Arthur Shippee)
>   2. UConn Purple Martins (Steve Morytko)
>   3. E. Haddam and Salem Birds, including ACADIAN FLYCATCHERS,
>      CERULEAN WARBLERS (Sailcarm)
>   4. Hamden yellow-billed cuckoo (Mark Scott)
>   5. Stratford seaducks, RT Loon (Frank Mantlik)
>   6. Hammo martin houses (Glenn Williams)
>   7. Re: wind turbines and birds (Chris Elphick)
>   8. Thank you (Lisa)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Mon, 21 May 2012 17:28:21 -0400
> From: Arthur Shippee <ashippee at snet.net>
> To: ctbirds <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] wind turbines and birds
> Message-ID: <B0B18FB6-1DC7-4D5A-B156-C914E9B13129 at snet.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> With wind power, however, one should factor in the energy costs of 
> manufacture & construction of each wind mill.  It takes a long time to pay 
> that initial energy cost off, I gather.
>
> (I also just heard that Hybrids in CO get their electricity mostly from 
> coal-powered plants -- i.e., they burn coal instead of gas...wow!)
>
> (MMS: another piece for you.)
>
> On May 21, 2012, at 3:04 PM, MIN HUANG wrote:
>
>> Siting is everything when it comes to both onshore and offshore wind 
>> energy.  Recent guidelines for mitigating land based effects were 
>> recently published by USFWS:  http://www.fws.gov/windenergy/
>>
>> If sited properly, and with sufficient input from stakeholders in the 
>> planning phases, wind energy effects on migratory species can be very 
>> minimal.  Unfortunately, good, steady wind is usually found where 
>> migratory species congregate too.  One needs to think about the 
>> cumulative effects.  That being said, wind energy, even when its 
>> potential is fully realized in North America from a capacity standpoint, 
>> will kill far fewer birds annually than cats or glass, which currently 
>> kill 100's of millions of birds annually.
>>
>> Min Huang
>> Columbia
>>
>> --- On Mon, 5/21/12, zellene sandler <zellene at earthlink.net> wrote:
>>
>>> From: zellene sandler <zellene at earthlink.net>
>>> Subject: [CT Birds] wind turbines and birds
>>> To: "ctbirds" <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
>>> Date: Monday, May 21, 2012, 10:52 AM
>>> My town is considering purchasing
>>> energy from a company that primarily uses
>>> wind energy. They have provided me with a few links that say
>>> that wind
>>> turbines killing birds is a myth. I don't believe this to be
>>> true. Do any
>>> of you know of a reliable source of information that shows
>>> the extent of
>>> bird kill by wind turbines...especially in the Northeast?
>>>
>>> Please email me directly. I can read your messages even if
>>> you get a note
>>> from my spamblocker. Thanks.
>>>
>>> Zellene
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological
>>> Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in
>>> Connecticut.
>>> For subscription information visit 
>>> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) 
>> for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
>> For subscription information visit 
>> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Mon, 21 May 2012 14:56:38 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Steve Morytko <smorytko at yahoo.com>
> To: "ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org" <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] UConn Purple Martins
> Message-ID:
> <1337637398.72092.YahooMailNeo at web161303.mail.bf1.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
>
> At UConn in Storrs this morning 3 Purple Martins?(they seem to be 
> sub-adult, 1M/2F)?were investigating the gourd rack located behind the 
> Young Building (near the jct of Horsebarn Hill Rd. and Gurleyville Rd.). 
> Hopefully they will stick around. A male American Kestrel was also seen 
> over the field.
>
> ?
> Steve Morytko
> Ashford, CT
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Mon, 21 May 2012 17:59:33 -0400
> From: Sailcarm <sailcarm at aol.com>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] E. Haddam and Salem Birds, including ACADIAN
> FLYCATCHERS, CERULEAN WARBLERS
> Message-ID: <8577B8F1-C950-4A79-8C4D-7F2909EA6F26 at aol.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> One of the nicest and most tranquil days of birding I have had in a long 
> time.  I spent the day in my local patch exploring some spots I seem to 
> rarely get to: West Rd. in Salem and Devil's Hopyard SP in E. Haddam.
>
> West Rd., off of RT. 82 in Salem:
>
> 6 CERULEAN WARBLERS, possibly more
> 1 Blue-winged Warbler, in nearby meadow
> 1 Indigo Bunting, meadow
> 2 Scarlet Tanagers, meadow
> 1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
> 1 Yellow-throated Vireo
> 1 Pileated Woodpecker
> 1 Great-crested Flycatcher
> Flock of Cedar Waxwings
>
> Several ovenbirds, redstarts, towhees, wood thrushes, B. orioles, chipping 
> sparrows, blue gray gnatcatchers.   Red-eyed vireos singing incessantly.
>
> Devil's Hopyard SP off RT 82  in E. Haddam:
>
> 2 ACADIAN FLYCATCHERS, one in the park, the other on the entrance road, 
> much closer to Rt. 82
> Several Black-throated Green Warblers
> 2 Worm-eating Warblers
> 1 Scarlet Tanager
> 1 Veery
> Several Wood Thrush and Ovenbirds
> Small flock of Chimney Swifts overhead
> Red-eyed Vireos everywhere
>
> And 1 Barred Owl somewhere in the hinterlands of eastern CT, with great 
> looks!
>
> Interesting experience with a bird song--  As I was leaving Devil's 
> Hopyard, I was stopped dead in my tracks by a song with which I was not 
> familiar, two notes clear and fairly loud.  I left the main road and 
> followed a trail  into the woods for a bit, and then I clearly heard the 
> WHOLE song:
>
> Zee zee ZOO ZOO zee
>
> Which meant from my car on the road from a distance I was only able to 
> hear a partial song. And further along down the road, the same thing 
> happened again.  Oh human frailty and aging ears!
>
> Carolyn Cimino
> Waterford
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Mon, 21 May 2012 15:44:56 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Mark Scott <tillercat at yahoo.com>
> To: "ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org" <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Hamden yellow-billed cuckoo
> Message-ID:
> <1337640296.88692.YahooMailNeo at web162603.mail.bf1.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>>From Mark Scott: 5/21/12 -- Farmington Canal Trail, Hamden --  
>>YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO along with many singing veeries
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Mon, 21 May 2012 16:16:52 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Frank Mantlik <mantlik at sbcglobal.net>
> To: Birds CT <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Stratford seaducks, RT Loon
> Message-ID: <1337642212.39072.YahooMailRC at web80002.mail.sp1.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>>From Frank Mantlik
>
> 5/21  Stratford, Park Blvd., Russian Beach - a seawatch 10:30-11:05 
> (before the
> dense fog and heavier rain hit; east winds @ 16+ mph) netted 1 
> RED-THROATED
> LOON, 3 LONG-TAILED DUCKS, and 1 WHITE-WINGED SCOTER.  I was hoping for 
> one of
> the many (Sooty) Shearwaters that are being seen from the south shore of 
> Long
> Island, NY recently.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Mon, 21 May 2012 17:43:53 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Glenn Williams <gswilliams9 at yahoo.com>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Hammo martin houses
> Message-ID:
> <1337647433.77287.YahooMailClassic at web161303.mail.bf1.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> Does anyone know why the Hammonassett Beach State Park martin houses are 
> still down and closed?
>
> Glenn Williams
> Mystic
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Mon, 21 May 2012 18:32:59 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Chris Elphick <elphick at sbcglobal.net>
> To: zellene at earthlink.net
> Cc: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] wind turbines and birds
> Message-ID: <1337650379.7915.YahooMailRC at web184415.mail.bf1.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> Hi Zellene (and others),
>
> I've followed the research literature on the effects of wind power on 
> birds
> quite closely.  As an associate editor for the Journal of Applied Ecology 
> (one
> of the top scientific journals in the field) I've also handled a number of
> papers on the topic ... there's an editorial I wrote, which summarizes 
> some of
> my thoughts about the state of research, here (it's a tad outdated, but 
> mostly
> holds true):
> http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2664.2008.01579.x/pdf
>
> I've not myself done much direct research on the topic, although I did 
> conduct
> one (very) small study in connection with a planned wind farm a few years 
> ago
> (full disclosure: it was funded by a wind power company ... but the entire 
> grant
> was only ~$5K, most of which went to supporting a student).
>
> First, as others have said (perhaps more politely), it is nonsense to 
> suggest
> that wind turbines don't ever kill birds - there is ample evidence that 
> they
> do.  On the other hand, so do cell phone towers, tall buildings, cars, oil 
> rigs,
> lighthouses, airplanes, and a multitude of other things that humans use.
> Frankly, bird seed - which is grown as an agricultural crop, shipped half 
> way
> across continents, etc., etc. - probably kills a fair number of birds. 
> So, as
> someone who studies population ecology and conservation biology, I think 
> that
> the key question is not whether it kills birds but whether it kills enough 
> to
> affect the size of populations or cause a serious conservation threat -
> especially relative to the alternative, which currently means more fossil 
> fuel
> use.
>
> As Anthony mentioned there are some cases where this is a serious concern.
> Golden eagles in California are the case that people typically cite, and 
> there
> have been real problems associated with some of the California wind farms. 
> But,
> those farms are some of the earliest built - and both the technology and
> knowledge of how best to site and operate turbines has improved 
> dramatically
> over the past couple of decades.  European studies (where the science is
> strongest) have shown that most raptor mortality can be caused by a small 
> number
> of turbines within a wind farm, and mostly under quite specific wind
> conditions/times of the year/day.  One solution is improved siting, as Min
> suggested.  Another - especially relevant when the wind farm already 
> exists - is
> to simply turn off individual turbines that are known to be a problem at 
> times
> when the risk of mortality is high.  Some of the most recent work suggests 
> that
> this can be done without a huge loss of revenue to the energy producer, so 
> this
> is probably often a very plausible solution.
>
> Other cases where concerns have been raised include Attwater's 
> prairie-chicken
> in the US, white-tailed eagles in Scotland, and golden eagles along the
> Appalachian chain.  Typically, the problems are likely to be acute only 
> for
> pretty rare species that are concentrated in a fairly small area.  In 
> contrast,
> there is very little evidence that wind farms are likely to affect 
> populations
> of song birds and unless there is a truly massive increase in the number 
> of
> turbines it is hard for me to see that they could have a serious impact at 
> the
> population level.  Certainly, there are much larger threats out there - 
> habitat
> loss continuing to be the biggest for most species (and yes, wind farms
> contribute to habitat loss too - but not nearly as much as many other 
> forms of
> development).  Bats are perhaps another issue, as they seem more seriously
> affected than birds, but I've yet to see a careful assessment of how wind 
> power
> ranks relative to other sources of energy for bats either.
>
> One other line of evidence that might be of interest, is that a few years 
> ago
> when the Cape Wind project was under discussion, Mass Audubon put a lot of 
> time
> and resources into researching the issue of offshore wind farms to 
> determine
> what stance they should take as an organization.  I know some of the 
> people
> involved with this process, and they took the issue very seriously. 
> Moreover,
> they were very aware that if they did not get the science right, it could 
> really
> hurt their organization, and they did a very careful job as a result. 
> Their
> conclusion - I think to the surprise of some of the people involved - was 
> on
> balance broadly positive (albeit with certain caveats, e.g., relating to
> siting).  More info on that here:
> http://www.massaudubon.org/news/index.php?id=317&type=news.
>
>
> So, as we they say in the ecology business "it's complicated" and to 
> paraphrase
> one of my favorite quotes - for every complex problem there is a simple 
> answer
> ... and it is wrong.  At a personal level my view is that every form of 
> power
> production causes problems of which killing birds is just one.  But, of 
> all the
> options I know of, wind power is (mostly) at the benign end of the 
> spectrum.
> And for what it is worth, when my family had the chance to switch to a 
> power
> supply that comes from largely renewable sources, we took it.
>
>
> Chris
>
> Chris Elphick
> Storrs, CT
> elphick at sbcglobal.net
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Mon, 21 May 2012 21:37:17 -0400
> From: Lisa <lisagagnon24 at yahoo.com>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Thank you
> Message-ID: <jnnw1uf64gf9y24artea2wgr.1337650637385 at email.android.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
>
> Thanks to all the ladies who answered my post about the lightning 
> bugs..... Lisa S.Spgs.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) 
> for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit 
> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>
> End of CTBirds Digest, Vol 1912, Issue 3
> **************************************** 





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