[CT Birds] CTBirds Digest, Vol 1923, Issue 3

Elena Coffey elena_ibclc at yahoo.com
Sat Jun 2 08:57:56 EDT 2012


Last week my blue birds had 3 eggs. This week the eggs and nest are gone. Do not see them  on the ground. A few sticks from a house wren are in the box. Can't imagine how the whole nest with eggs disappeared.  Can anyone shed any light on this ?
Elena Coffey, Marlborough

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 1, 2012, at 9:39 PM, ctbirds-request at lists.ctbirding.org wrote:

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> Today's Topics:
> 
>   1. Long Beach, Stratford (Parrot)
>   2. CT Cumulative 2012 Bird List, through May (Frank Mantlik)
>   3. Alder Flycatcher and Breeding Bird Evidence (Stephen Broker)
>   4. ID Help: White-faced Ibis? (Michael Richardson)
>   5. Boston Hollow and Yale Forest,    Ashford - the nursery is
>      filling up fast! (Mntncougar at aol.com)
>   6. Re: ID Help: White-faced Ibis? (Michael Richardson)
>   7. Re: ID Help: White-faced Ibis? (Michael Richardson)
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Message: 1
> Date: Fri, 1 Jun 2012 17:18:37 -0400
> From: Parrot <sisserou at charter.net>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Long Beach, Stratford
> Message-ID: <C438BDC4-89CF-42EA-8104-22A349988718 at charter.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> 
> Two pair of Piping Plover with 2 chicks each, one Peregine Falcon and one Black-bellied Plover.
> 
> Ron, Ashford
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 2
> Date: Fri, 1 Jun 2012 14:35:40 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Frank Mantlik <mantlik at sbcglobal.net>
> To: Birds CT <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] CT Cumulative 2012 Bird List, through May
> Message-ID: <1338586540.22938.YahooMailRC at web80005.mail.sp1.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
> 
> Hi all,
> Here's the CT Cumulative Bird List for 2012, through May 31.
> Species order reflects current AOU/ABA sequence.
> 
> 
> CONNECTICUT CUMULATIVE 2012 BIRD LIST
> As reported to the CT birding listserve and eBird.  
> * CT Review Species (written details requested). 
> 299 species as of  May 31, 2012 (compared to 298 in 2011).
> Compiled by Frank Mantlik
> 
> Pink-footed Goose*
> Greater White-fronted Goose
> Snow Goose
> Brant 
> Barnacle Goose*
> Cackling Goose
> Canada Goose
> Mute Swan 
> Trumpeter Swan
> Tundra Swan
> Wood Duck
> Gadwall
> Eurasian Wigeon
> American Wigeon
> American Black Duck
> Mallard
> Blue-winged Teal
> Northern Shoveler
> Northern Pintail
> Green-winged Teal
> Canvasback
> Redhead
> Ring-necked Duck
> Greater Scaup
> Lesser Scaup
> Common Eider
> Surf Scoter
> White-winged Scoter
> Black Scoter
> Long-tailed Duck
> Bufflehead
> Common Goldeneye
> Barrow?s Goldeneye
> Hooded Merganser
> Common Merganser
> Red-breasted Merganser
> Ruddy Duck
> Northern Bobwhite
> Ring-necked Pheasant 
> Ruffed Grouse
> Wild Turkey
> Red-throated Loon
> Common Loon
> Pied-billed Grebe
> Horned Grebe
> Red-necked Grebe
> Northern Gannet
> Double-crested Cormorant
> Great Cormorant
> American Bittern
> Least Bittern
> Great Blue Heron
> Great Egret
> Snowy Egret
> Little Blue Heron
> Tricolored Heron
> Cattle Egret
> Green Heron
> Black-crowned Night-Heron
> Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
> Glossy Ibis
> White-faced Ibis*
> Black Vulture
> Turkey Vulture
> Osprey
> Swallow-tailed Kite
> Mississippi Kite
> Bald Eagle
> Northern Harrier
> Sharp-shinned Hawk
> Cooper?s Hawk
> Northern Goshawk
> Red-shouldered Hawk
> Broad-winged Hawk
> Red-tailed Hawk
> Rough-legged Hawk
> Golden Eagle
> American Kestrel
> Merlin
> Peregrine Falcon
> Clapper Rail
> Virginia Rail
> Sora
> American Coot
> Sandhill Crane
> Black-bellied Plover
> American Golden-Plover
> Semipalmated Plover
> Piping Plover
> Killdeer
> American Oystercatcher
> Spotted Sandpiper
> Solitary Sandpiper
> Greater Yellowlegs
> Willet
> Lesser Yellowlegs
> Upland Sandpiper
> Whimbrel
> Ruddy Turnstone
> Red Knot
> Sanderling
> Semipalmated Sandpiper 
> Least Sandpiper
> White-rumped Sandpiper
> Pectoral Sandpiper
> Purple Sandpiper
> Dunlin
> Curlew Sandpiper*
> Ruff *
> Short-billed Dowitcher
> Long-billed Dowitcher
> Wilson's Snipe
> American Woodcock
> Wilson?s Phalarope
> Red-necked Phalarope
> Black-legged Kittiwake*
> Bonaparte?s Gull
> Black-headed Gull
> Little Gull
> Laughing Gull
> Ring-billed Gull
> Herring Gull
> Thayer?s Gull*
> Iceland Gull
> Lesser Black-backed Gull
> Glaucous Gull
> Great Black-backed Gull
> Least Tern
> Caspian Tern
> Roseate Tern
> Common Tern
> Forster?s Tern
> Black Skimmer
> Dovekie *
> Common Murre*
> Thick-billed Murre*
> Razorbill 
> Rock Pigeon 
> Mourning Dove
> Monk Parakeet 
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo
> Black-billed Cuckoo
> Barn Owl
> Eastern Screech-Owl
> Great Horned Owl
> Snowy Owl
> Barred Owl
> Long-eared Owl
> Short-eared Owl
> Northern Saw-whet Owl
> Common Nighthawk
> Chuck-will?s-widow *
> Whip-poor-will
> Chimney Swift
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird
> Rufous Hummingbird
> Belted Kingfisher
> Red-headed Woodpecker
> Red-bellied Woodpecker
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
> Downy Woodpecker
> Hairy Woodpecker
> Northern Flicker
> Pileated Woodpecker
> Olive-sided Flycatcher
> Eastern Wood-Pewee
> Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
> Acadian Flycatcher
> Alder Flycatcher
> Willow Flycatcher
> Least Flycatcher
> Eastern Phoebe
> Great Crested Flycatcher
> Eastern Kingbird
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher *
> Northern Shrike
> White-eyed Vireo
> Yellow-throated Vireo
> Blue-headed Vireo
> Warbling Vireo
> Philadelphia Vireo
> Red-eyed Vireo
> Blue Jay
> American Crow
> Fish Crow
> Common Raven
> Horned Lark
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow
> Purple Martin
> Tree Swallow
> Bank Swallow
> Barn Swallow
> Cliff Swallow
> Black-capped Chickadee
> Tufted Titmouse
> Red-breasted Nuthatch
> White-breasted Nuthatch
> Brown Creeper
> Carolina Wren
> House Wren
> Winter Wren
> Marsh Wren
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
> Golden-crowned Kinglet
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet
> Eastern Bluebird
> Townsend?s Solitaire *
> Veery
> Gray-cheeked Thrush
> Swainson?s Thrush
> Hermit Thrush
> Wood Thrush
> American Robin
> Gray Catbird
> Northern Mockingbird
> Brown Thrasher
> European Starling 
> American Pipit
> Cedar Waxwing
> Lapland Longspur
> Snow Bunting
> Ovenbird
> Worm-eating Warbler
> Louisiana Waterthrush
> Northern Waterthrush
> Blue-winged Warbler
> (Lawrence?s Warbler)
> Golden-winged Warbler
> Black & White Warbler
> Tennessee Warbler
> Orange-crowned Warbler
> Nashville Warbler
> Mourning Warbler
> Kentucky Warbler
> Common Yellowthroat
> Hooded Warbler
> American Redstart
> Cape May Warbler
> Cerulean Warbler
> Northern Parula
> Magnolia Warbler
> Bay-breasted Warbler
> Blackburnian Warbler
> Yellow Warbler
> Chestnut-sided Warbler
> Blackpoll Warbler
> Black-throated Blue Warbler
> Palm Warbler
> Pine Warbler
> Yellow-rumped Warbler
> Yellow-throated Warbler
> Prairie Warbler 
> Black-throated Green Warbler
> Canada Warbler
> Wilson?s Warbler
> Yellow-breasted Chat
> Eastern Towhee
> American Tree Sparrow
> Chipping Sparrow
> Clay-colored Sparrow
> Field Sparrow
> Vesper Sparrow
> Savannah Sparrow
> Grasshopper Sparrow
> Nelson?s Sparrow
> Saltmarsh Sparrow
> Seaside Sparrow
> Fox Sparrow
> Song Sparrow
> Lincoln?s Sparrow
> Swamp Sparrow
> White-throated Sparrow
> Harris?s Sparrow*
> White-crowned Sparrow
> Dark-eyed Junco
> Summer Tanager
> Scarlet Tanager
> Western Tanager*
> Northern Cardinal
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak
> Blue Grosbeak
> Indigo Bunting
> Dickcissel
> Bobolink
> Red-winged Blackbird
> Eastern Meadowlark
> Yellow-headed Blackbird
> Rusty Blackbird
> Common Grackle
> Boat-tailed Grackle
> Brown-headed Cowbird
> Orchard Oriole
> Baltimore Oriole
> Purple Finch
> House Finch
> White-winged Crossbill
> Common Redpoll
> Pine Siskin
> American Goldfinch
> House Sparrow 
> 
> Copyright? COA 2012.
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 3
> Date: Fri, 1 Jun 2012 17:38:27 -0400
> From: Stephen Broker <ls.broker at cox.net>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Alder Flycatcher and Breeding Bird Evidence
> Message-ID: <359D91B8-F2D1-410D-A605-0CE24004F0C7 at cox.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> 
> With hope and a major commitment in time, Connecticut soon will gear up to conduct its second Breeding Bird Atlas as a follow-up to its first statewide breeding bird atlas conducted in the mid-1980s.  The timetable and strategy for such a Connecticut breeding bird atlas are under discussion within the state's major ornithological organizations.
> 
> This past year, Massachusetts completed the field work for its Mass Breeding Bird Atlas 2, held from 2007 through 2011.  Massachusetts Commonwealth was divided into 1055 atlas blocks based on USGS topographic maps, and these blocks were surveyed by atlas volunteers for evidence of avian breeding during the five-year period.  The data for Mass BBA2 are available on-line at www.massaudubon.org/bba2/.  At this website, one can view the breeding bird codes used in Massachusetts for the atlas.  The evidence for breeding in Mass BBA2 ranges from Observed [present but no evidence of breeding] to Possible Breeder to Probable Breeder to Confirmed Breeder.  There were seven different ways that a field observer could establish a species as a Probable Breeder.  They included finding a male/female pair, singing seven days or more apart, on permanent territory, agitated behavior or anxiety calls, courtship behavior of copulation, visiting a probable nest site.  (See the website for specific articulation of these breeding codes.)  The key aspect of these evidences of probable breeding was that the observation had to be made during so-called Safe Dates established for each bird species based on knowledge of their life history patterns within the state.  
> 
> Confirmed Breeder status in a given atlas block was achieved in any of 13 different ways, and this evidence included occupied nest, carrying nest material, nest building, physiological evidence (used by banders); distraction display (select species), unoccupied nest, precocial young, fledged young, carrying food, feeding young, carrying fecal sac, nest with eggs, and nest with young.  (Again, see the website for a full description of these breeding codes.)    
> 
> In the case of Alder Flycatcher, the established safe dates were from June 5 through August 1.  Any date that Alder Flycatcher was observed in Massachusetts prior to June 5 was recorded as Observed and did not qualify for a higher ranking.  The exception to this standard was if some category of Confirmed Breeder was recorded prior to the start (or end) of safe dates.  So, in this example, if an Alder Flycatcher was heard singing on June 5 and again on June 12, it achieved the status of Probable Breeder PR(S).  The species would not be 'upgraded' to Confirmed Breeder unless one of the evidences listed above for confirmation of breeding was observed in the field.
> 
> There's lots more that one can learn about breeding bird surveys by going to the website listed above.  Mass Audubon published a "State of the Birds 2011:  Documenting Changes in Massachusetts' Birdlife" report based on the first four years of the atlas, and the report is accompanied by a website, www.massaudubon.org/StateoftheBirds.  Further analysis of the five years of field data continues.
> 
> I spent a major portion of the last three spring/summer seasons doing field work for MassBBA2 on Outer Cape Cod, and I now find my birding here less purposeful now that the atlas field work is completed.  Connecticut, step up to the plate!
> 
> Steve Broker (Cheshire, CT and Wellfleet, MA) 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 4
> Date: Fri, 1 Jun 2012 17:41:40 -0400
> From: Michael Richardson <michael_s_richardson at hotmail.com>
> To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] ID Help: White-faced Ibis?
> Message-ID: <SNT136-W57DFD0296C971C891231ABCE080 at phx.gbl>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
> 
> 
> I'm going to take another shot at this since I didn't get a response the first time sending.
> 
> I took this photo at Sherwood Island State Park in Westport, CT on 5/19/2012:
> 
> http://flic.kr/p/c77395
> 
> After I got home and examined the photo, I am wondering the ibis on the far right is the White-faced Ibis that was spotted there recently.  It looks fairly different than the other two, which are clearly Glossy Ibis.  It has a longer bill, duller feathers with no reddish-brown, and is generally larger overall.  Anyone have any input on this?
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> Michael Richardson
> Connecticutwilderness.com
> Norwalk, CT
> 
>                         
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 5
> Date: Fri, 1 Jun 2012 20:03:46 -0400 (EDT)
> From: Mntncougar at aol.com
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Boston Hollow and Yale Forest,    Ashford - the
>    nursery is filling up fast!
> Message-ID: <2883c.5579de67.3cfab261 at aol.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
> 
> I had 2 interesting observations this morning. I had stopped where I  
> usually hear a Northern Waterthrush and several other birds when I saw a truck  
> coming, so I pulled over to let him pass. Since I was stopped I shut off the 
> car  to sit for a minute and look and listen. Immediately I heard the NOWA 
> call once,  and heard a lot of Waterthrush type chip notes. Then I saw 2 
> birds chasing each  other around in the brush right across the road from me and 
> realized they  were Waterthrushes, and I assumed it was the mated pair that 
> lives there. But  they both landed in the (dirt) roadway, ignoring me, and 
> began pecking for  gravel. Before long they were less than 10 feet from the 
> car. Meanwhile, I was  hearing some soft mewing sounds and wondered if they 
> could be from young still  in the nest. But when I took a really close look 
> at the birds I realized there  was something different about them, didn't 
> look quite like adult Northerns. And  I discovered the mewing sounds were 
> coming from them. The streaking on the  breasts looked somehow different, the 
> streaks leaving a small white area under  the chin, though not as much as a 
> Louisiana, and the usual strong white  line over the eye was very vague and 
> hard to see, even at close range. But the  tails were bobbing so there was no 
> doubt they were Northern Waterthrushes. It  finally dawned on me that they 
> were fledglings! The chasing was sibling play,  not mating behavior.
> That was a very birdy spot and while I sat there I heard and saw  the 
> Northern Waterthrushes, as well as  hearing a Louisiana  Waterthrush (about 100 
> yds down the road), lots of Ovenbirds, at least 2  Canada Warblers, 2 or 3 
> Black and white Warblers, 4 or more Black-throated  Greens, 1 Black-throated 
> Blue, Red-eyed and Blue-headed Vireos, (distantly)  a Winter Wren, E. 
> Wood-pewee, Crows, and a few of the usual suspects.  
> I moved on a couple of hundred yards and as I was going by, the Winter Wren 
> sounded off right in my ear. He was singing a much-lengthened version of 
> his  usual song so I pulled over and decided to try and spot him. Several  
> weeks ago I saw a pair in the same location, one gathering nesting  materials. 
> I walked back down the road and after about 5 minutes of just  watching the 
> hillside I saw a bird fly in and land at the base of a big rock. It  was 
> right in a little patch of sunshine in front of a hole in the  rocks, and I 
> spotted it easily with my bins, but then I got much more than  I'd bargained 
> for! It was feeding a nestling, probably not more than a week old,  with 
> "fuzzy hair" and a stubby tail less than half full length, pointing  straight up 
> in the air! And as I watched, 2 more chicks appeared, as well as the  other 
> parent, so I had 5 Wrens at the same time within 2 square  feet.  The 
> nestlings were no more than 2/3 the size of the parents,  and If wrens are cute, 
> these are adorable! Periodically dad would rear  back and let go with his 
> song. I think it was pure joy!
> I believe the Ravens left the Hollow last Sunday. The parents were making a 
> ruckus, trying to get their fledgling to go fly with them, and on Monday 
> and  every day I've been there since there has been no sign of them. The same 
> thing  has happened around the first of June the last three years. I have 
> no idea  whether they stay in the general area or perhaps go a little farther 
> north. If  they are true to form they will make an appearance again in late 
> summer,  although they may not stay. The owner of the new house on Barlow 
> Mill tells me  he heard/saw them in the winter, but I wonder if they were the 
> same birds. When  I started visiting regularly in mid-March I saw/heard no 
> sign of them for  several weeks. 
> 
> Today's Ebird list:
> 
> Boston Hollow/Barlow Mill, Windham, US-CT
> Jun 1, 2012 7:45 AM - 2:00  PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 8.0 mile(s)
> 42 species
> 
> Broad-winged Hawk  1
> Turkey Vulture 1
> Rock Pigeon 1
> Mourning Dove 4
> Red-bellied  Woodpecker 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 6
> Acadian Flycatcher 1
> Least Flycatcher  1
> Eastern Phoebe 3
> Great Crested Flycatcher 1
> Blue-headed Vireo  2
> Warbling Vireo 6
> Red-eyed Vireo 20
> Blue Jay 2
> American Crow  3
> Black-capped Chickadee 3
> Winter Wren   (5 Spotted, 2 adults  feeding 3 nestlings with "fuzzy hair" 
> and stubby tails less than half full  length, sticking straight up. Adorable!)
> House Wren 1
> Veery 10
> Hermit Thrush 1
> American Robin 12
> Gray Catbird  10
> Ovenbird 25
> Louisiana Waterthrush 4
> Northern Waterthrush  5   (2 juvies chasing each other around and pecking 
> sand from the  road)
> Blue-winged Warbler 1
> Black-and-white Warbler 6
> Common  Yellowthroat 8
> Yellow Warbler 8
> Black-throated Blue Warbler 2
> Pine  Warbler 5
> Black-throated Green Warbler 12
> Canada Warbler 1
> Eastern  Towhee 12
> Chipping Sparrow 20
> Song Sparrow 2
> Scarlet Tanager  1
> Northern Cardinal 2
> Red-winged Blackbird 6
> Common Grackle  2
> Brown-headed Cowbird 2
> Baltimore Oriole 8
> 
> Don Morgan
> Coventry
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 6
> Date: Fri, 1 Jun 2012 21:36:42 -0400
> From: Michael Richardson <michael_s_richardson at hotmail.com>
> To: <ghanisek at rep-am.com>, <hunterj at wilton.k12.ct.us>,
>    <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] ID Help: White-faced Ibis?
> Message-ID: <SNT136-W24D315B099969C4042B4FFCE090 at phx.gbl>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
> 
> 
> Hi James and Greg,
> 
> Thanks for taking a look.  FYI, in the photo of the three ibis, it is the one on the far right that I am wondering about.  I uploaded two new photos for this bird that may help with the identification:
> 
> http://flic.kr/p/c9CYiA
> http://flic.kr/p/c9CYBj
> 
> I understand that the white line above the eye is a key identification feature for the glossy ibis, however this one bird just looks so different compared to the other glossy ibis that were nearby.  Especially when you compare bill size.    Maybe it's just a juvenile, or a hybrid or something else.  To me, the bill length compared to the size of it's body looks more like the glossy ibis, however it is lacking the facial features of a white-faced ibis in breeding plumage.  
> 
> Thanks again for your input,
> 
> Mike
> 
>> From: ghanisek at rep-am.com
>> To: michael_s_richardson at hotmail.com
>> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] ID Help: White-faced Ibis?
>> Date: Fri, 1 Jun 2012 20:18:28 -0400
>> 
>> I didn't respond the first time, because I just don't think you can see 
>> enough at that distance.
>> 
>> Greg
>> 
>> ----- Original Message ----- 
>> From: "Michael Richardson" <michael_s_richardson at hotmail.com>
>> To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
>> Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 5:41 PM
>> Subject: [CT Birds] ID Help: White-faced Ibis?
>> 
>> 
>>> 
>>> I'm going to take another shot at this since I didn't get a response the 
>>> first time sending.
>>> 
>>> I took this photo at Sherwood Island State Park in Westport, CT on 
>>> 5/19/2012:
>>> 
>>> http://flic.kr/p/c77395
>>> 
>>> After I got home and examined the photo, I am wondering the ibis on the 
>>> far right is the White-faced Ibis that was spotted there recently.  It 
>>> looks fairly different than the other two, which are clearly Glossy Ibis. 
>>> It has a longer bill, duller feathers with no reddish-brown, and is 
>>> generally larger overall.  Anyone have any input on this?
>>> 
>>> Thanks,
>>> 
>>> Michael Richardson
>>> Connecticutwilderness.com
>>> Norwalk, CT
>>> 
>>> 
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) 
>>> for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
>>> For subscription information visit 
>>> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>>> 
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>                         
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 7
> Date: Fri, 1 Jun 2012 21:39:38 -0400
> From: Michael Richardson <michael_s_richardson at hotmail.com>
> To: <ghanisek at rep-am.com>, <hunterj at wilton.k12.ct.us>,
>    <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] ID Help: White-faced Ibis?
> Message-ID: <SNT136-W783D7A126FFD182946FCBCE090 at phx.gbl>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
> 
> 
> er...i meant to say that the bill size compared to the body, looks more like white-faced ibis to me...  I think it's too late and I need to stop thinking about ibis lol.
> 
> -Mike
> 
>> From: michael_s_richardson at hotmail.com
>> To: ghanisek at rep-am.com; hunterj at wilton.k12.ct.us; ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
>> Date: Fri, 1 Jun 2012 21:36:42 -0400
>> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] ID Help: White-faced Ibis?
>> 
>> 
>> Hi James and Greg,
>> 
>> Thanks for taking a look.  FYI, in the photo of the three ibis, it is the one on the far right that I am wondering about.  I uploaded two new photos for this bird that may help with the identification:
>> 
>> http://flic.kr/p/c9CYiA
>> http://flic.kr/p/c9CYBj
>> 
>> I understand that the white line above the eye is a key identification feature for the glossy ibis, however this one bird just looks so different compared to the other glossy ibis that were nearby.  Especially when you compare bill size.    Maybe it's just a juvenile, or a hybrid or something else.  To me, the bill length compared to the size of it's body looks more like the glossy ibis, however it is lacking the facial features of a white-faced ibis in breeding plumage.  
>> 
>> Thanks again for your input,
>> 
>> Mike
>> 
>>> From: ghanisek at rep-am.com
>>> To: michael_s_richardson at hotmail.com
>>> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] ID Help: White-faced Ibis?
>>> Date: Fri, 1 Jun 2012 20:18:28 -0400
>>> 
>>> I didn't respond the first time, because I just don't think you can see 
>>> enough at that distance.
>>> 
>>> Greg
>>> 
>>> ----- Original Message ----- 
>>> From: "Michael Richardson" <michael_s_richardson at hotmail.com>
>>> To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
>>> Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 5:41 PM
>>> Subject: [CT Birds] ID Help: White-faced Ibis?
>>> 
>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> I'm going to take another shot at this since I didn't get a response the 
>>>> first time sending.
>>>> 
>>>> I took this photo at Sherwood Island State Park in Westport, CT on 
>>>> 5/19/2012:
>>>> 
>>>> http://flic.kr/p/c77395
>>>> 
>>>> After I got home and examined the photo, I am wondering the ibis on the 
>>>> far right is the White-faced Ibis that was spotted there recently.  It 
>>>> looks fairly different than the other two, which are clearly Glossy Ibis. 
>>>> It has a longer bill, duller feathers with no reddish-brown, and is 
>>>> generally larger overall.  Anyone have any input on this?
>>>> 
>>>> Thanks,
>>>> 
>>>> Michael Richardson
>>>> Connecticutwilderness.com
>>>> Norwalk, CT
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) 
>>>> for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
>>>> For subscription information visit 
>>>> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>                         
>> _______________________________________________
>> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
>> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>                         
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
> 
> End of CTBirds Digest, Vol 1923, Issue 3
> ****************************************




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