[CT Birds] CTBirds Digest, Vol 1949, Issue 1

Ron ronandlee at yahoo.com
Wed Jun 27 12:09:55 EDT 2012


Sent from my Verizon Wireless Phone

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>Today's Topics:
>
>   1. Boston Hollow/Yale Forest, Ashford, Union 6-24-12,	6-26-12
>      (Mntncougar at aol.com)
>   2. A different birding experience      Keith Mueller
>      (kmueller at ntplx.net)
>   3. 6/26 Hammonasset evening - apparent hybrid heron (Nick Bonomo)
>   4. Proposed polo field at East Rock Park, New Haven/Hamden
>      (Mark Scott)
>   5. Recent sighting's (paul cianfaglione)
>   6. Re: Recent sighting's (Nick Bonomo)
>   7. Semipalmated Plover 6/26 (Frank Mantlik)
>   8. Fwd: BSC Latest News: The State of Canada's Birds
>      (semismart9 at aol.com)
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Message: 1
>Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2012 18:48:05 -0400 (EDT)
>From: Mntncougar at aol.com
>To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
>Subject: [CT Birds] Boston Hollow/Yale Forest, Ashford, Union 6-24-12,
>	6-26-12
>Message-ID: <27156.11516aec.3d1b9625 at aol.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
>
>Notable birds were:
>Black-billed Cuckoo
>Purple Finch
>Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Adult female being chased around by a  Fluffy
>       Fledgling         (say that 10 times  fast)
>Brown Creeper with high-pitched, incomplete song - first year or a  
>fledgling?
>Red-breasted Nuthatch calling with 2 higher pitched calls replying -  
>fledglings or 
>     nestlings?
>Acadian Flycatcher and Least Flycatcher calling at the same spot (where the 
> ACFL has been)
>My last unknown song confirmed as an Indigo Bunting when I finally found  
>him.
>First of the season juvie Chipping Sparrow, striped breast, indistinct  
>markings on cap
> 
>Ebird list June 24 and 26 combined:
> 
>Boston Hollow/Barlow Mill, Windham, US-CT
>Jun 24, 2012 8:30 AM - 1:00  PM
>Protocol: Traveling
>9.0 mile(s)
>Comments: Report for 6-24-12 with a  few birds from 6-26-12 included
>59 species
>
>Great Blue Heron  1
>Turkey Vulture 4
>Osprey 2
>Broad-winged Hawk 1
>Red-tailed Hawk  1
>Mourning Dove 4
>Black-billed Cuckoo 1
>Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  4
>Downy Woodpecker 2
>Hairy Woodpecker 1
>Northern Flicker 1
>Pileated  Woodpecker 1
>Eastern Wood-Pewee 6
>Acadian Flycatcher 1
>Least Flycatcher  2
>Eastern Phoebe 10
>Great Crested Flycatcher 2
>Blue-headed Vireo  4
>Red-eyed Vireo 10
>Blue Jay 4
>American Crow 3
>Common Raven  3
>Tree Swallow 5
>Black-capped Chickadee 12
>Tufted Titmouse  10
>Red-breasted Nuthatch 3
>White-breasted Nuthatch 2
>Brown Creeper  1
>Winter Wren 2
>Eastern Bluebird 1
>Veery 12
>Hermit Thrush 6
>Wood  Thrush 1
>American Robin 10
>Gray Catbird 15
>Cedar Waxwing 12
>Ovenbird  12
>Louisiana Waterthrush 4
>Northern Waterthrush 2
>Black-and-white  Warbler 8
>Common Yellowthroat 8
>Magnolia Warbler 1
>Blackburnian Warbler  2
>Yellow Warbler 6
>Chestnut-sided Warbler 4
>Black-throated Blue Warbler  3
>Pine Warbler 6
>Black-throated Green Warbler 8
>Canada Warbler  2
>Eastern Towhee 8
>Chipping Sparrow 15
>Song Sparrow 4
>Scarlet  Tanager 2
>Northern Cardinal 2
>Indigo Bunting 1
>Brown-headed Cowbird  6
>Baltimore Oriole 1
>Purple Finch 1
>American Goldfinch 5
>
>Don Morgan
>Coventry
> 
> 
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 2
>Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2012 20:17:53 -0400
>From: kmueller at ntplx.net
>To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
>Subject: [CT Birds] A different birding experience      Keith Mueller
>Message-ID: <20120626201753.96062i3tsphk22i9 at webmail.netplex.net>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; DelSp="Yes";
>	format="flowed"
>
>I just got back from three weeks away. For a different birding  
>experience, see my blog: http://coastalbirds2.blogspot.com/
>
>Enjoy,
>
>Keith Mueller
>Killingworth
>kmuellerart.blogspot.com
>
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 3
>Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2012 21:20:09 -0400
>From: Nick Bonomo <nbonomo at gmail.com>
>To: CTBirds <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
>Subject: [CT Birds] 6/26 Hammonasset evening - apparent hybrid heron
>Message-ID:
>	<CABgXtNefzF15+nBydr6M4oX+9NSYpDueKV21+uKddmr4cYwpxw at mail.gmail.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
>Carolyn Sedgwick and I spent a few hours at Hammonasset this evening.
>Skies were partly to mostly cloudy with a cool WNW breeze. There are
>some nice rain pools at the west end, but they did not hold anything
>of note today. The highlight was one of those oddball Tricolored-like
>Herons in the nature center marsh. Details and photos to follow - I
>will post to CTBirds when I get the photos up in a day or two. A very
>cool bird.
>
>We also had 4 Little Blue Herons (3 adults and one pied immature), 8
>Glossy Ibis, Clapper Rail, 2 Roseate Tern foraging offshore with a
>feeding flock of 150 Common Terns, Willow Flycatcher, Marsh Wren, and
>an Orchard Oriole.
>
>Nick Bonomo
>Wallingford, CT
>www.shorebirder.com
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 4
>Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2012 19:50:12 -0700 (PDT)
>From: Mark Scott <tillercat at yahoo.com>
>To: "ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org" <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
>Subject: [CT Birds] Proposed polo field at East Rock Park, New
>	Haven/Hamden
>Message-ID:
>	<1340765412.46025.YahooMailNeo at web162604.mail.bf1.yahoo.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
>
>In case you are not aware of the proposal to put a polo grounds in the old archery field at East Rock Park, New Haven/Hamden:
>?
>http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/east_rock_eyed_for_polo_arena/
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 5
>Date: Wed, 27 Jun 2012 09:15:48 -0400
>From: paul cianfaglione <pgcianfaglione at gmail.com>
>To: CT Lists <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
>Subject: [CT Birds] Recent sighting's
>Message-ID:
>	<CADzAYRxQu_DMdeeex8zQn8bwkiEcNbLwUBSjM3kCNEkMf2Z_uw at mail.gmail.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
>6/27 Rocky Hill, Rocky Hill Meadows -  1 LESSER YELLOWLEGS.
>6/25 Canton, Canton Yard  - 5 AMERICAN WOODCOCK (2 adults, 3 good sized
>young), 1 just out of nest hole YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER.
>
>Paul Cianfaglione
>Canton
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 6
>Date: Wed, 27 Jun 2012 10:20:21 -0400
>From: Nick Bonomo <nbonomo at gmail.com>
>To: paul cianfaglione <pgcianfaglione at gmail.com>
>Cc: CT Lists <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
>Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Recent sighting's
>Message-ID: <9DC9783C-E249-4085-A372-E3057C9E7E07 at gmail.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain;	charset=us-ascii
>
>Let the "fall" shorebird migration begin. June 27 perhaps a couple days early for CT but pretty much on schedule! Expect a trickle of Lesser Yellowlegs, Least Sandpipers, and SB Dows over the next week or two as they are usually the first common migrants to return.
>
>Nick
>Wallingford, CT
>
>Sent from my iPhone
>
>On Jun 27, 2012, at 9:15 AM, paul cianfaglione <pgcianfaglione at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> 6/27 Rocky Hill, Rocky Hill Meadows -  1 LESSER YELLOWLEGS.
>> 6/25 Canton, Canton Yard  - 5 AMERICAN WOODCOCK (2 adults, 3 good sized
>> young), 1 just out of nest hole YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER.
>> 
>> Paul Cianfaglione
>> Canton
>> _______________________________________________
>> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
>> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
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>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 7
>Date: Wed, 27 Jun 2012 07:39:50 -0700 (PDT)
>From: Frank Mantlik <mantlik at sbcglobal.net>
>To: Birds CT <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
>Subject: [CT Birds] Semipalmated Plover 6/26
>Message-ID: <1340807990.94012.YahooMailRC at web80013.mail.sp1.yahoo.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>>From Frank Mantlik
>6/26  Stratford, Oak Bluff Ave., Long Beach - 1 Semipalmated Plover (early 
>southbound migrant?)  along the marsh side beyond the end of parking lot.  Also 
>1 Common Loon, 1 adult Laughing Gull, 1 Orchard Oriole.
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 8
>Date: Wed, 27 Jun 2012 11:44:49 -0400 (EDT)
>From: semismart9 at aol.com
>To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
>Subject: [CT Birds] Fwd: BSC Latest News: The State of Canada's Birds
>Message-ID: <8CF2292EB3FBB36-B8C-1A2DE at webmail-stg-m05.sysops.aol.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
>
>
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Bird Studies Canada <BirdStudiesCanada at bsc-eoc.org>
>To: bsc at bird.bsc-eoc.org <bsc at flarenet.kwic.com>
>Sent: Wed, Jun 27, 2012 10:28 am
>Subject: BSC Latest News: The State of Canada's Birds
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>This Week's
>Highlights
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>News
>State of Canada?s Birds
>?tat des populations 
>d?oiseaux au Canada 
>Join Us!
>What Can We Learn from Canada?s Birds?
>Que nous r?v?lent les populations d?oiseaux du Canada? 
>Archives
>Bird Studies 
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>Main Page
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>27 June 2012 
>Download a Printable PDF Version   
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> 
>State of Canada?s Birds Report Released Today
>
>27 June 2012 ? Bird Studies Canada and our North American Bird Conservation Initiative partners in Canada are pleased to announce the release of the first-ever State of Canada?s Birds report. The report draws on 40 years of data to create a picture of the current health of Canada?s birds. 
>   Birds are crucial indicators of ecosystem health. Overall, nearly half (44%) of the species studied have declined since 1970. This is particularly true for aerial insectivores (birds that catch insects in flight) and grassland birds, which have fallen by 60% and 40% respectively. Species that migrate the farthest are experiencing the steepest declines ? emphasizing the perils of migration, as well as the importance of conditions on wintering grounds. 
>   Although many species are declining, we have learned that where conservation is applied, it works. Thanks to the efforts of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan, of which BSC is a partner, waterfowl as a group are doing well. Rebounding raptor populations are a direct result of pesticide regulations. Expensive efforts have helped restore some critically endangered species, but conserving birds before they reach ?critical? status is much more cost-effective. 
>   ?This report is unprecedented. Its findings are both troubling and inspiring,? said Bird Studies Canada?s President George Finney. ?Partnerships, Citizen Science programs, and increased investment have contributed immensely to our conservation goals for some species. We need to build on these existing efforts, as it is clear that many other species are in serious trouble. A world without birds is not an option.? 
>   The report is now available online. To obtain an electronic copy, visit the State of Canada?s Birds website. Bird Studies Canada members will receive a printed copy of the full report in early July, with their Summer issue of BirdWatch Canada. 
>Lancement de l??tat des populations d?oiseaux au Canada 
>
>27 juin 2012 ? ?tudes d?Oiseaux Canada (?OC) et ses partenaires de l?Initiative de conservation des oiseaux de l?Am?rique du Nord sont heureux d?annoncer le lancement du tout premier rapport intitul? ?tat des populations d?oiseaux au Canada. Le document, qui repose sur les donn?es des 40 derni?res ann?es, brosse un portrait de l??tat actuel des oiseaux au Canada. 
>   Les oiseaux sont des indicateurs d?une importance cruciale en ce qui concerne la sant? des ?cosyst?mes. Malheureusement, selon le rapport, les effectifs de 44 % des esp?ces ?tudi?es ont subi des d?clins depuis 1970. Les populations d?insectivores a?riens (oiseaux s?alimentant d?insectes en vol) et d?oiseaux des prairies ont respectivement diminu? de 60 et de 40 %. Les oiseaux qui migrent sur de longue distance sont ?galement g?n?ralement ceux qui montrent les d?clins les plus importants. Ceci illustre bien les risques que pose la migration pour les oiseaux, de m?me que l?importance de porter attention aux conditions trouv?es dans les aires d?hivernage. 
>   Bien que nombre d?esp?ces subissent un d?clin, les mesures de conservation employ?es sont efficaces. Les populations de rapaces et de sauvagine augmentent gr?ce aux programmes de gestion et de conservation. Des mesures co?teuses ont permis de r?tablir les populations d?esp?ces fortement menac?es, mail il est nettement plus ?conomique d?agir avant que ces derni?res atteignent un ?tat ? critique ?. 
>   ? Ce rapport est sans pr?c?dent. Les r?sultats des ?tudes qui y sont pr?sent?s sont ? la fois troublants et encourageants, ? pr?cise George Finney, pr?sident d??tudes d?Oiseaux Canada. ? Des partenariats, des programmes reposant sur la collaboration de citoyens chercheurs et un financement accru ont ?norm?ment facilit? l?atteinte de nos objectifs de conservation chez certaines esp?ces. Nous devons poursuivre nos efforts actuels pour venir ? la rescousse de nombreuses autres esp?ces fortement menac?es. Nous ne pouvons vivre dans un monde sans oiseaux. ? 
>   Le rapport est disponible en ligne. Vous pourrez en obtenir une version ?lectronique sur le site Web de l??tat des populations d?oiseaux au Canada. Les membres d??OC recevront un exemplaire du rapport complet au d?but de juillet dans le m?me envoi que le num?ro d??t? de BirdWatch Canada.
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>What Can We Learn from Canada?s Birds?
>Bird Studies Canada carries out critical research on bird populations across the country. Investment in the monitoring and conservation of birds and their habitats supports a healthy environment for people. 
>   You can help us protect birds and the environment for future generations. If you are not yet a Bird Studies Canada member, please join us! Or make a donation to support bird research and conservation. 
>   The State of Canada?s Birds report is a reflection of the contributions of dedicated BSC members and citizen scientists like you. Our volunteers and friends are making a difference to the important task of bird conservation in Canada. We thank you, and look forward to your continued support.
>Que nous r?v?lent les populations d?oiseaux du Canada?
>?tudes d?Oiseaux Canada effectuent des recherches indispensables sur l?avifaune dans tout le pays. Les fonds consacr?s ? la conservation des oiseaux et de leurs habitats nous permettent tous de jouir des bienfaits d?un environnement sain. 
>   Vous pouvez nous aider ? pr?server l?avifaune et l?environnement au profit des g?n?rations futures. Devenez membre d??OC ou faites un don de fa?on ? soutenir les activit?s de recherche et de conservation des oiseaux.
>   L??tat des populations d?oiseaux au Canada est le fruit du d?vouement de membres et de citoyens chercheurs comme vous. Collectivement, nous pouvons avoir un impact mesurable dans la conservation des oiseaux au Canada. L??quipe d??OC vous remercie de votre soutien continu.
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>------------------------------
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>This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
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>End of CTBirds Digest, Vol 1949, Issue 1
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