[CT Birds] CTBirds Digest, Vol 1978, Issue 1

kevindoyle01 at charter.net kevindoyle01 at charter.net
Thu Jul 26 10:50:19 EDT 2012


Good-day,

Would you please let Beverly Propen know that I was down @ the MCC 
Wednesday also and spent nearly 3 hours photographing exactly she wrote 
about in her obsevations if she's interseted in pictures. Thank you. 
kevindoyle01 at charter.net


On Thu, Jul 26, 2012 at 8:57 AM, ctbirds-request at lists.ctbirding.org 
wrote:

> Send CTBirds mailing list submissions to
> 	ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
> 	 
> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> 	ctbirds-request at lists.ctbirding.org
>
> You can reach the person managing the list at
> 	ctbirds-owner at lists.ctbirding.org
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of CTBirds digest..."
>
>
> ***  When replying to this message please trim off the unrelated 
> portions ***
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. Upland Sandpiper on ISS,	plus Western Willet and Caspian
>       Terns (Comins, Patrick)
>    2. More AOU taxonomy talk (paul cianfaglione)
>    3. Re: More AOU taxonomy talk (Mark Szantyr)
>    4. Old Saybrook (Paul Desjardins)
>    5. Solitary Sandpiper (Marty Swanhall)
>    6. Berlin Ospreys (Kathleen Perpetuaclark)
>    7. Milford Point Nesting (Roy Harvey)
>    8. Summer wanderers Goshen (Kfinnan at aol.com)
>    9. CACC (Beverly Propen)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 11:28:54 -0700
> From: "Comins, Patrick" <PCOMINS at audubon.org>
> To: "ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org" <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Upland Sandpiper on ISS,	plus Western Willet and
> 	Caspian Terns
> Message-ID:
> 	 
> <CC85A9209D06AD4D9EA9D14FA196198A14BE6954A3 at VA3DIAXVS6C1.RED001.local>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Kim Anglace and I had an Upland Sandpiper on our ISS this morning at 
> Rocky Hill Meadows.  Later, we were joined by Ewa Holland and had 2 
> Caspian Terns and a 'western' Willet at Menunketesuck Flats in 
> Westbrook.  You can see photos and read more about the observations 
> here:
> http://ctwaterbirds.blogspot.com/2012/07/upland-sandpiper-on-iss.html
>
> Or if you're on Facebook, like our page and you can see even mroe 
> photos here (you may be able to view the photos even if you don't 
> belong to Facebook, you might have to remove the "s" in the http, or 
> try the second link):
>
> 
> https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.247269778709667.35522.168520783251234&type=1
> 
> http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.247269778709667.35522.168520783251234&type=1
>
> Patrick M. Comins
> Director of Bird Conservation
>
> Audubon Connecticut
> 185 East Flat Hill Road
> Southbury, CT 06488
>
> Phone: (203)264-5098 x308
>
> Fax: (203)264-6332
>
> pcomins at audubon.org
> http://iba.audubon.org/iba/viewState.do?state=US-CT
> Audubon Connecticut is on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AudubonCT
> Friends of Conte is on Facebook: 
> http://www.facebook.com/pages/Friends-of-the-Silvio-O-Conte-National-Fish-and-Wildlife-Refuge/121976791147545?v=wall
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 15:08:38 -0400
> From: paul cianfaglione <pgcianfaglione at gmail.com>
> To: CT Lists <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] More AOU taxonomy talk
> Message-ID:
> 	<CADzAYRxcFxL5-SxS9bPw9VCuTb4x0bGgaydvX-DYjofNPNk1Vg at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
>
> This information was gleaned (letter and response) from the latest 
> edition
> of Birding Magazine. Some of you may find this interesting.
>
> Paul Cianfaglione
> Canton
>
>
>
>
> The AOU Check-list: Humbleness? Hubris? Hypocrisy?
>
>
>
> For now, most birders and the ABA are content to be sheep and follow 
> the
> proclamations of the American Ornithologists Union (AOU) about what 
> is, and
> what isn?t, a species ? and thus can be counted on a list. It?s just 
> easier
> that way, even if some of the AOU?s decisions are ill-founded or
> inconsistent. But if the AOU were your dentist or hairdresser, would 
> you go
> back to them?
>
>
>
> One of the more puzzling things in recent AOU proclamations and 
> checklists
> has been the introduction of the category ?incertae sedis? in their
> checklists meaning ?of uncertain placement.? Yes, the AOU is actually
> saying, and often despite genetic analysis, that they don?t know where 
> a
> few groups of birds fit in the overall classification. At first this
> gesture might seem like humility, but the obverse is that the AOU is
> implying they really do know where all the other birds do belong.
>
>
>
> Of course, a quick perusal of the regularly published AOU taxonomic 
> updates
> over the last 20 years shows that major changes happen all the time. 
> Those
> changes extend well beyond the occasional genus of ?uncertain 
> placement.?
> Often, they involve major changes to avian relationships that were 
> ?known?
> to be ?true.? Why not be honest and just write ?incertae sedis? at the
> start of every checklist and be done with it?
>
>
>
> Steve Howell
>
> California
>
>
>
> Response:
>
>
>
> Other than finding another outlet for hurling his predictably volcanic
> invective at the AOU, Howell?s major point is evidently that no one,
> including the AOU, knows ?where birds belong.? That point was arguably
> valid a couple of decades ago, before DNA-sequencing technology and
> analyses, but all classifications explicitly contained varying degrees 
> of
> uncertainty and were best treated as hypotheses. However, unless 
> Howell has
> an alternative explanation-of which the world is yet unaware-for the
> mechanisms of inheritance and the interpretation of DNA sequence data, 
> then
> ?we? actually do ?know? where most groups of birds belong with an
> unprecedented degree of certainty, and Howell?s statements contain an
> exceptionally unfavorably arrogance-to-ignorance ratio. The monophyly
> (namely, that all members share a common ancestor) of the overwhelming
> majority of orders and families of North American birds has been
> corroborated by multiple independent genetic data-sets. Those 
> taxonomic
> changes to which Howell refers are in response to those data.
>
>
>
> There remain, however, a few groups of uncertain familial 
> placement-also
> known as incertae sedis. This placement is not ?despite? genetic 
> analysis,
> as Howell states, but rather because of them, and we are likely only a 
> few
> analyses away from certain placement of the few taxa currently listed 
> as
> incertae sedis- for example, the saltators and the Bananaquit. We are 
> also
> in the process of transferring blocks of genera among the Emberizidae,
> Thraupidae, and Parulidae. A few others, such as the 
> not-a-real-warbler
> Yellow-breasted Chat, will likely spend time in incertae sedis until 
> new
> data reveal where their branches join in the avian tree. Incertae 
> sedis
> acts as a holding pen for those taxa for which new data indicate that 
> they
> do not belong where previously placed but are still ambiguous as to 
> where
> they really do belong.
>
>
>
> It?s only fair to extend Howell?s smug choose-your-dentist-wisely 
> analogy
> to some of his own taxonomy. For example, Howell?s own (A Guide to the
> Birds of Mexico and Northern Central America) data-free treatment of
> Worm-eating and Swainson?s warblers as members of the same 
> genus-despite
> their radical differences in song structure, nest architecture and
> placement, and foraging behavior-would now require of all warblers 
> except
> the Ovenbird into that genus to make it monophyletic. Would you go 
> back to
> that dentist?
>
>
>
> Van Remsen
>
> Member, AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and
> Middle American Birds
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 15:25:10 -0400
> From: Mark Szantyr <birdinggeek at gmail.com>
> To: paul cianfaglione <pgcianfaglione at gmail.com>
> Cc: CT Lists <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] More AOU taxonomy talk
> Message-ID: <7164411D-0A8C-4B8A-BF9A-0D77FDD0E8BE at gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain;	charset=utf-8
>
> Wow.  I am glad its butterfly season. I will think about this in 
> October... Or not
>
> Mark
> On Jul 25, 2012, at 3:08 PM, paul cianfaglione 
> <pgcianfaglione at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> This information was gleaned (letter and response) from the latest 
>> edition
>> of Birding Magazine. Some of you may find this interesting.
>>
>> Paul Cianfaglione
>> Canton
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> The AOU Check-list: Humbleness? Hubris? Hypocrisy?
>>
>>
>>
>> For now, most birders and the ABA are content to be sheep and follow 
>> the
>> proclamations of the American Ornithologists Union (AOU) about what 
>> is, and
>> what isn?t, a species ? and thus can be counted on a list. It?s just 
>> easier
>> that way, even if some of the AOU?s decisions are ill-founded or
>> inconsistent. But if the AOU were your dentist or hairdresser, would 
>> you go
>> back to them?
>>
>>
>>
>> One of the more puzzling things in recent AOU proclamations and 
>> checklists
>> has been the introduction of the category ?incertae sedis? in their
>> checklists meaning ?of uncertain placement.? Yes, the AOU is actually
>> saying, and often despite genetic analysis, that they don?t know 
>> where a
>> few groups of birds fit in the overall classification. At first this
>> gesture might seem like humility, but the obverse is that the AOU is
>> implying they really do know where all the other birds do belong.
>>
>>
>>
>> Of course, a quick perusal of the regularly published AOU taxonomic 
>> updates
>> over the last 20 years shows that major changes happen all the time. 
>> Those
>> changes extend well beyond the occasional genus of ?uncertain 
>> placement.?
>> Often, they involve major changes to avian relationships that were 
>> ?known?
>> to be ?true.? Why not be honest and just write ?incertae sedis? at 
>> the
>> start of every checklist and be done with it?
>>
>>
>>
>> Steve Howell
>>
>> California
>>
>>
>>
>> Response:
>>
>>
>>
>> Other than finding another outlet for hurling his predictably 
>> volcanic
>> invective at the AOU, Howell?s major point is evidently that no one,
>> including the AOU, knows ?where birds belong.? That point was 
>> arguably
>> valid a couple of decades ago, before DNA-sequencing technology and
>> analyses, but all classifications explicitly contained varying 
>> degrees of
>> uncertainty and were best treated as hypotheses. However, unless 
>> Howell has
>> an alternative explanation-of which the world is yet unaware-for the
>> mechanisms of inheritance and the interpretation of DNA sequence 
>> data, then
>> ?we? actually do ?know? where most groups of birds belong with an
>> unprecedented degree of certainty, and Howell?s statements contain an
>> exceptionally unfavorably arrogance-to-ignorance ratio. The monophyly
>> (namely, that all members share a common ancestor) of the 
>> overwhelming
>> majority of orders and families of North American birds has been
>> corroborated by multiple independent genetic data-sets. Those 
>> taxonomic
>> changes to which Howell refers are in response to those data.
>>
>>
>>
>> There remain, however, a few groups of uncertain familial 
>> placement-also
>> known as incertae sedis. This placement is not ?despite? genetic 
>> analysis,
>> as Howell states, but rather because of them, and we are likely only 
>> a few
>> analyses away from certain placement of the few taxa currently listed 
>> as
>> incertae sedis- for example, the saltators and the Bananaquit. We are 
>> also
>> in the process of transferring blocks of genera among the 
>> Emberizidae,
>> Thraupidae, and Parulidae. A few others, such as the 
>> not-a-real-warbler
>> Yellow-breasted Chat, will likely spend time in incertae sedis until 
>> new
>> data reveal where their branches join in the avian tree. Incertae 
>> sedis
>> acts as a holding pen for those taxa for which new data indicate that 
>> they
>> do not belong where previously placed but are still ambiguous as to 
>> where
>> they really do belong.
>>
>>
>>
>> It?s only fair to extend Howell?s smug choose-your-dentist-wisely 
>> analogy
>> to some of his own taxonomy. For example, Howell?s own (A Guide to 
>> the
>> Birds of Mexico and Northern Central America) data-free treatment of
>> Worm-eating and Swainson?s warblers as members of the same 
>> genus-despite
>> their radical differences in song structure, nest architecture and
>> placement, and foraging behavior-would now require of all warblers 
>> except
>> the Ovenbird into that genus to make it monophyletic. Would you go 
>> back to
>> that dentist?
>>
>>
>>
>> Van Remsen
>>
>> Member, AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and
>> Middle American Birds
>> _______________________________________________
>> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association 
>> (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
>> For subscription information visit 
>> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 16:39:18 -0400
> From: Paul Desjardins <paul.desjardins2 at gmail.com>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Old Saybrook
> Message-ID: <38348E4C-B26A-4379-B4FE-EF0E0A31C323 at gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> This afternoon at the Founders Memorial Park about a dozen Purple 
> Martins. Some were young being fed. No sign of martin houses nearby 
> but was wondering if there is a martin colony in the area. Does anyone 
> know of a Purple Martin colony in Old Saybrook?
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 17:19:30 -0400
> From: Marty Swanhall <swanhallm at gmail.com>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Solitary Sandpiper
> Message-ID:
> 	<CA+kfD6L-DE44Pm+Zx2xgRE=fY5=RVX74VUTiJBAMJbUZ5-Ux1Q at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> Solitary Sandpiper in wetlands on South Pomperaug Road in Woodbury. 
> With
> its call and head bobs, it looked liked it had the hiccups.
>
> Marty in Woodbury
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 19:10:10 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Kathleen Perpetuaclark <perpetuaclark at yahoo.com>
> To: "ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org" <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Berlin Ospreys
> Message-ID:
> 	<1343268610.94421.YahooMailNeo at web160702.mail.bf1.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>> From Kathleen-Marie Clark:
>
> Berlin, Berlin Turnpike at Home Depot; 3 PM ;Tuesday July 25
>
> Osprey seen circling the pond in front of Home Depot . I parked at CVS 
> to look with my fortunately handy binoculars and a second osprey 
> immediately flew into a nearby tree and remained perched for 5 minutes 
> while osprey #1 continued to cruise.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 19:22:29 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey at snet.net>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Milford Point Nesting
> Message-ID:
> 	<1343269349.5323.YahooMailClassic at web181105.mail.ne1.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> Passing this along.
>
>
>  From Kevin Doyle:
> Today Wednesday at Milford Point where I have been following nesting 
> American Oyster Catchers I was pleasantly surprised to find one chick 
> though 2 weeks ago the female was sitting on 3 eggs. I have been made 
> aware that the two pairs at Milford had already lost eggs this season 
> and we are fortunate that at least one survived. Both parents were in 
> a slowly rising tidal pool with the chick running around on the shells 
> and both parents didn't hesitate to chase off a black crowned night 
> heron and a snowy egret who got just a little close for their comfort.
>
>
> Roy Harvey
> Beacon Falls, CT
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2012 08:03:43 -0400 (EDT)
> From: Kfinnan at aol.com
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] Summer wanderers Goshen
> Message-ID: <46be.2dc2bfbb.3d428c1e at aol.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
>
> Yesterday, 7/25, late afternoon, over Woodridge Lake in Goshen, we saw 
> the one-year-old Bald Eagle first reported on Sunday, this time being 
> harassed by an Osprey.
>  A Sharp-shinned Hawk later flew over, harassed all the way by an E. 
> Kingbird.  The Hawk apparently thought about turning the tables on the 
> Kingbird but the Kingbird manuevered high above and kept after  him. 
> This was presumably the same SS Hawk as on Sunday but we can't  be 
> sure.
>  Kevin Finnan
> Goshen
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2012 08:57:24 -0400
> From: Beverly Propen <bpropen at gmail.com>
> To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
> Subject: [CT Birds] CACC
> Message-ID:
> 	<CAMcNzak9vGaO_rjU2HHKaC97fc1HbaQ-5=YtrKwYYGxzjC0T_g at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> 7/25  Milford, Connecticut Audubon Coastal Center,  10AM-1PM, sunny
> 73-82F,low tide
> 11 Purple Martins at the gourds,
> Carolina Wren singing, 4 Mockingbirds including 2 Juveniles eating 
> from the
> berries on Arrowwood Viburnum.  All 3 juvenile ospreys are flying.
> At 10AM  1 Juvenile osprey and the female were on the perch (female 
> had
> fish in talons) and 2 Juveniles on nest-preening, resting-1 juvenile 
> with
> fish tucked under it.
> 2 other ospreys flying around marsh and 1 on mudflats.  At 11:50AM the
> adult female brought the fish to the nest and there was no rushing to 
> eat
> it. At 11:55 one juvenile took the fish to the perch.  Noon-there was 
> 1
> juvenile and the adult female on the nest with fish.
> Then a tug of war fight broke out between the adult female and the
> juvenile.  The tug of war went on for 5 minutes-juvenile had its 
> talons dug
> into the fish, and female was attempting to pull it away from the
> juvenile.  Lots of squawking & wing flapping going on.  Could this 
> have
> been a lesson the parent was trying to teach the juvenile-how to 
> protect
> its fish?  For the remainder of the morning, once the juvenile on the 
> nest
> got hold of the fish , it mantled it after taking a few bites.
> There was a large flock of mixed "peeps" flying through the marsh all
> morning- When they landed occasionally I could see semipalmated 
> plovers,
> semipalmated sandpipers and least sandpipers.  Also viewed on marsh 
> (from
> windows) were 5 Great egrets, 3 Snowy egrets, 13 American  Black 
> ducks, ,
> 3 Yellow crowned night herons, 26 D.C.Cormorants-several juveniles,  2
> Common terns, mute swans.
> Beverly Propen, Orange
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association 
> (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit 
> http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org
>
> End of CTBirds Digest, Vol 1978, Issue 1
> ****************************************




More information about the CTBirds mailing list