[CT Birds] Old Saybrook Purple Martins

John Ogren northernrail at comcast.net
Thu Jul 26 15:35:23 EDT 2012


   I have a colony of Purple Martins. This year I had about 10 adults and 4 nests. Within the last 2 weeks they have all fledged. As far as I can tell the population now is about 14-16. I did lose 4 to House Sparrows before they fledged. At this point the entire colony is dispersed for a good portion of the day. For the last couple of days most of the birds have been returning to roost in the evening.
   This colony is located in the Plum Bank Marsh (behind the town beaches)- probably 2 miles as the martin flies from Founders Park. The birds Paul saw could have been mine but I am sure there are other colonies closer. I do know of a larger colony on the Oyster River.
  Salt Marsh Sparrows do not seem to be as numerous this year in the Plum Bank Marsh. I have lived here since 1992 and for the past 4-5 years it seems that the marsh floods over at least once every 2-3 weeks. I am sure as the climate keeps changing this will certainly become more of a problem for this species.
John Ogren
 

John Ogren
 
manager
Northern Rail Services, Inc
203-395-6589
fax 860-339-5209
www.northernrailservices.com
 

________________________________
 From: "ctbirds-request at lists.ctbirding.org" <ctbirds-request at lists.ctbirding.org>
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Sent: Thursday, July 26, 2012 8:57 AM
Subject: CTBirds Digest, Vol 1978, Issue 1
  
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Today's Topics:

   1. Upland Sandpiper on ISS,    plus Western Willet and Caspian
      Terns (Comins, Patrick)
   2. More AOU taxonomy talk (paul cianfaglione)
   3. Re: More AOU taxonomy talk (Mark Szantyr)
   4. Old Saybrook (Paul Desjardins)
   5. Solitary Sandpiper (Marty Swanhall)
   6. Berlin Ospreys (Kathleen Perpetuaclark)
   7. Milford Point Nesting (Roy Harvey)
   8. Summer wanderers Goshen (Kfinnan at aol.com)
   9. CACC (Beverly Propen)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 11:28:54 -0700
From: "Comins, Patrick" <PCOMINS at audubon.org>
To: "ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org" <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Subject: [CT Birds] Upland Sandpiper on ISS,    plus Western Willet and
    Caspian Terns
Message-ID:
    <CC85A9209D06AD4D9EA9D14FA196198A14BE6954A3 at VA3DIAXVS6C1.RED001.local>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Kim Anglace and I had an Upland Sandpiper on our ISS this morning at Rocky Hill Meadows.  Later, we were joined by Ewa Holland and had 2 Caspian Terns and a 'western' Willet at Menunketesuck Flats in Westbrook.  You can see photos and read more about the observations here:
http://ctwaterbirds.blogspot.com/2012/07/upland-sandpiper-on-iss.html

Or if you're on Facebook, like our page and you can see even mroe photos here (you may be able to view the photos even if you don't belong to Facebook, you might have to remove the "s" in the http, or try the second link):

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.247269778709667.35522.168520783251234&type=1
http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.247269778709667.35522.168520783251234&type=1

Patrick M. Comins
Director of Bird Conservation

Audubon Connecticut
185 East Flat Hill Road
Southbury, CT 06488

Phone: (203)264-5098 x308

Fax: (203)264-6332

pcomins at audubon.org
http://iba.audubon.org/iba/viewState.do?state=US-CT
Audubon Connecticut is on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AudubonCT
Friends of Conte is on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Friends-of-the-Silvio-O-Conte-National-Fish-and-Wildlife-Refuge/121976791147545?v=wall



------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 15:08:38 -0400
From: paul cianfaglione <pgcianfaglione at gmail.com>
To: CT Lists <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Subject: [CT Birds] More AOU taxonomy talk
Message-ID:
    <CADzAYRxcFxL5-SxS9bPw9VCuTb4x0bGgaydvX-DYjofNPNk1Vg at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252

This information was gleaned (letter and response) from the latest edition
of Birding Magazine. Some of you may find this interesting.

Paul Cianfaglione
Canton




The AOU Check-list: Humbleness? Hubris? Hypocrisy?



For now, most birders and the ABA are content to be sheep and follow the
proclamations of the American Ornithologists Union (AOU) about what is, and
what isn?t, a species ? and thus can be counted on a list. It?s just easier
that way, even if some of the AOU?s decisions are ill-founded or
inconsistent. But if the AOU were your dentist or hairdresser, would you go
back to them?



One of the more puzzling things in recent AOU proclamations and checklists
has been the introduction of the category ?incertae sedis? in their
checklists meaning ?of uncertain placement.? Yes, the AOU is actually
saying, and often despite genetic analysis, that they don?t know where a
few groups of birds fit in the overall classification. At first this
gesture might seem like humility, but the obverse is that the AOU is
implying they really do know where all the other birds do belong.



Of course, a quick perusal of the regularly published AOU taxonomic updates
over the last 20 years shows that major changes happen all the time. Those
changes extend well beyond the occasional genus of ?uncertain placement.?
Often, they involve major changes to avian relationships that were ?known?
to be ?true.? Why not be honest and just write ?incertae sedis? at the
start of every checklist and be done with it?



Steve Howell

California



Response:



Other than finding another outlet for hurling his predictably volcanic
invective at the AOU, Howell?s major point is evidently that no one,
including the AOU, knows ?where birds belong.? That point was arguably
valid a couple of decades ago, before DNA-sequencing technology and
analyses, but all classifications explicitly contained varying degrees of
uncertainty and were best treated as hypotheses. However, unless Howell has
an alternative explanation-of which the world is yet unaware-for the
mechanisms of inheritance and the interpretation of DNA sequence data, then
?we? actually do ?know? where most groups of birds belong with an
unprecedented degree of certainty, and Howell?s statements contain an
exceptionally unfavorably arrogance-to-ignorance ratio. The monophyly
(namely, that all members share a common ancestor) of the overwhelming
majority of orders and families of North American birds has been
corroborated by multiple independent genetic data-sets. Those taxonomic
changes to which Howell refers are in response to those data.



There remain, however, a few groups of uncertain familial placement-also
known as incertae sedis. This placement is not ?despite? genetic analysis,
as Howell states, but rather because of them, and we are likely only a few
analyses away from certain placement of the few taxa currently listed as
incertae sedis- for example, the saltators and the Bananaquit. We are also
in the process of transferring blocks of genera among the Emberizidae,
Thraupidae, and Parulidae. A few others, such as the not-a-real-warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat, will likely spend time in incertae sedis until new
data reveal where their branches join in the avian tree. Incertae sedis
acts as a holding pen for those taxa for which new data indicate that they
do not belong where previously placed but are still ambiguous as to where
they really do belong.



It?s only fair to extend Howell?s smug choose-your-dentist-wisely analogy
to some of his own taxonomy. For example, Howell?s own (A Guide to the
Birds of Mexico and Northern Central America) data-free treatment of
Worm-eating and Swainson?s warblers as members of the same genus-despite
their radical differences in song structure, nest architecture and
placement, and foraging behavior-would now require of all warblers except
the Ovenbird into that genus to make it monophyletic. Would you go back to
that dentist?



Van Remsen

Member, AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and
Middle American Birds


------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 15:25:10 -0400
From: Mark Szantyr <birdinggeek at gmail.com>
To: paul cianfaglione <pgcianfaglione at gmail.com>
Cc: CT Lists <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Subject: Re: [CT Birds] More AOU taxonomy talk
Message-ID: <7164411D-0A8C-4B8A-BF9A-0D77FDD0E8BE at gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=utf-8

Wow.  I am glad its butterfly season. I will think about this in October... Or not

Mark 

On Jul 25, 2012, at 3:08 PM, paul cianfaglione <pgcianfaglione at gmail.com> wrote:

> This information was gleaned (letter and response) from the latest edition
> of Birding Magazine. Some of you may find this interesting.
> 
> Paul Cianfaglione
> Canton
> 
> 
> 
> 
> The AOU Check-list: Humbleness? Hubris? Hypocrisy?
> 
> 
> 
> For now, most birders and the ABA are content to be sheep and follow the
> proclamations of the American Ornithologists Union (AOU) about what is, and
> what isn?t, a species ? and thus can be counted on a list. It?s just easier
> that way, even if some of the AOU?s decisions are ill-founded or
> inconsistent. But if the AOU were your dentist or hairdresser, would you go
> back to them?
> 
> 
> 
> One of the more puzzling things in recent AOU proclamations and checklists
> has been the introduction of the category ?incertae sedis? in their
> checklists meaning ?of uncertain placement.? Yes, the AOU is actually
> saying, and often despite genetic analysis, that they don?t know where a
> few groups of birds fit in the overall classification. At first this
> gesture might seem like humility, but the obverse is that the AOU is
> implying they really do know where all the other birds do belong.
> 
> 
> 
> Of course, a quick perusal of the regularly published AOU taxonomic updates
> over the last 20 years shows that major changes happen all the time. Those
> changes extend well beyond the occasional genus of ?uncertain placement.?
> Often, they involve major changes to avian relationships that were ?known?
> to be ?true.? Why not be honest and just write ?incertae sedis? at the
> start of every checklist and be done with it?
> 
> 
> 
> Steve Howell
> 
> California
> 
> 
> 
> Response:
> 
> 
> 
> Other than finding another outlet for hurling his predictably volcanic
> invective at the AOU, Howell?s major point is evidently that no one,
> including the AOU, knows ?where birds belong.? That point was arguably
> valid a couple of decades ago, before DNA-sequencing technology and
> analyses, but all classifications explicitly contained varying degrees of
> uncertainty and were best treated as hypotheses. However, unless Howell has
> an alternative explanation-of which the world is yet unaware-for the
> mechanisms of inheritance and the interpretation of DNA sequence data, then
> ?we? actually do ?know? where most groups of birds belong with an
> unprecedented degree of certainty, and Howell?s statements contain an
> exceptionally unfavorably arrogance-to-ignorance ratio. The monophyly
> (namely, that all members share a common ancestor) of the overwhelming
> majority of orders and families of North American birds has been
> corroborated by multiple independent genetic data-sets. Those taxonomic
> changes to which Howell refers are in response to those data.
> 
> 
> 
> There remain, however, a few groups of uncertain familial placement-also
> known as incertae sedis. This placement is not ?despite? genetic analysis,
> as Howell states, but rather because of them, and we are likely only a few
> analyses away from certain placement of the few taxa currently listed as
> incertae sedis- for example, the saltators and the Bananaquit. We are also
> in the process of transferring blocks of genera among the Emberizidae,
> Thraupidae, and Parulidae. A few others, such as the not-a-real-warbler
> Yellow-breasted Chat, will likely spend time in incertae sedis until new
> data reveal where their branches join in the avian tree. Incertae sedis
> acts as a holding pen for those taxa for which new data indicate that they
> do not belong where previously placed but are still ambiguous as to where
> they really do belong.
> 
> 
> 
> It?s only fair to extend Howell?s smug choose-your-dentist-wisely analogy
> to some of his own taxonomy. For example, Howell?s own (A Guide to the
> Birds of Mexico and Northern Central America) data-free treatment of
> Worm-eating and Swainson?s warblers as members of the same genus-despite
> their radical differences in song structure, nest architecture and
> placement, and foraging behavior-would now require of all warblers except
> the Ovenbird into that genus to make it monophyletic. Would you go back to
> that dentist?
> 
> 
> 
> Van Remsen
> 
> Member, AOU Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and
> Middle American Birds
> _______________________________________________
> This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.
> For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 16:39:18 -0400
From: Paul Desjardins <paul.desjardins2 at gmail.com>
To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: [CT Birds] Old Saybrook
Message-ID: <38348E4C-B26A-4379-B4FE-EF0E0A31C323 at gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

This afternoon at the Founders Memorial Park about a dozen Purple Martins. Some were young being fed. No sign of martin houses nearby but was wondering if there is a martin colony in the area. Does anyone know of a Purple Martin colony in Old Saybrook?


------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 17:19:30 -0400
From: Marty Swanhall <swanhallm at gmail.com>
To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: [CT Birds] Solitary Sandpiper
Message-ID:
    <CA+kfD6L-DE44Pm+Zx2xgRE=fY5=RVX74VUTiJBAMJbUZ5-Ux1Q at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Solitary Sandpiper in wetlands on South Pomperaug Road in Woodbury.   With
its call and head bobs, it looked liked it had the hiccups.

Marty in Woodbury


------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 19:10:10 -0700 (PDT)
From: Kathleen Perpetuaclark <perpetuaclark at yahoo.com>
To: "ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org" <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Subject: [CT Birds] Berlin Ospreys
Message-ID:
    <1343268610.94421.YahooMailNeo at web160702.mail.bf1.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

>From Kathleen-Marie Clark:

Berlin, Berlin Turnpike at Home Depot; 3 PM ;Tuesday July 25

Osprey seen circling the pond in front of Home Depot . I parked at CVS to look with my fortunately handy binoculars and a second osprey immediately flew into a nearby tree and remained perched for 5 minutes while osprey #1 continued to cruise.

------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 19:22:29 -0700 (PDT)
From: Roy Harvey <rmharvey at snet.net>
To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: [CT Birds] Milford Point Nesting
Message-ID:
    <1343269349.5323.YahooMailClassic at web181105.mail.ne1.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Passing this along.


From Kevin Doyle:
Today Wednesday at Milford Point where I have been following nesting American Oyster Catchers I was pleasantly surprised to find one chick though 2 weeks ago the female was sitting on 3 eggs. I have been made aware that the two pairs at Milford had already lost eggs this season and we are fortunate that at least one survived. Both parents were in a slowly rising tidal pool with the chick running around on the shells and both parents didn't hesitate to chase off a black crowned night heron and a snowy egret who got just a little close for their comfort.


Roy Harvey
Beacon Falls, CT



------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2012 08:03:43 -0400 (EDT)
From: Kfinnan at aol.com
To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: [CT Birds] Summer wanderers Goshen
Message-ID: <46be.2dc2bfbb.3d428c1e at aol.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

Yesterday, 7/25, late afternoon, over Woodridge Lake in Goshen, we saw  the 
one-year-old Bald Eagle first reported on Sunday, this time being  harassed 
by an Osprey.

A Sharp-shinned Hawk later flew over, harassed all the way by an E.  
Kingbird.  The Hawk apparently thought about turning the tables on the  Kingbird 
but the Kingbird manuevered high above and kept after  him.  This was 
presumably the same SS Hawk as on Sunday but we can't  be sure.

Kevin Finnan
Goshen

------------------------------

Message: 9
Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2012 08:57:24 -0400
From: Beverly Propen <bpropen at gmail.com>
To: ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org
Subject: [CT Birds] CACC
Message-ID:
    <CAMcNzak9vGaO_rjU2HHKaC97fc1HbaQ-5=YtrKwYYGxzjC0T_g at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

7/25  Milford, Connecticut Audubon Coastal Center,  10AM-1PM, sunny
73-82F,low tide
11 Purple Martins at the gourds,
Carolina Wren singing, 4 Mockingbirds including 2 Juveniles eating from the
berries on Arrowwood Viburnum.  All 3 juvenile ospreys are flying.
At 10AM  1 Juvenile osprey and the female were on the perch (female had
fish in talons) and 2 Juveniles on nest-preening, resting-1 juvenile with
fish tucked under it.
2 other ospreys flying around marsh and 1 on mudflats.  At 11:50AM the
adult female brought the fish to the nest and there was no rushing to eat
it. At 11:55 one juvenile took the fish to the perch.  Noon-there was 1
juvenile and the adult female on the nest with fish.
Then a tug of war fight broke out between the adult female and the
juvenile.  The tug of war went on for 5 minutes-juvenile had its talons dug
into the fish, and female was attempting to pull it away from the
juvenile.  Lots of squawking & wing flapping going on.  Could this have
been a lesson the parent was trying to teach the juvenile-how to protect
its fish?  For the remainder of the morning, once the juvenile on the nest
got hold of the fish , it mantled it after taking a few bites.
There was a large flock of mixed "peeps" flying through the marsh all
morning- When they landed occasionally I could see semipalmated plovers,
semipalmated sandpipers and least sandpipers.  Also viewed on marsh (from
windows) were 5 Great egrets, 3 Snowy egrets, 13 American  Black ducks, ,
3 Yellow crowned night herons, 26 D.C.Cormorants-several juveniles,  2
Common terns, mute swans.
Beverly Propen, Orange


------------------------------

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