[CT Birds] Fwd: [MASSBIRD] Black-browed Albatross S of Martha's Vineyard

Jan Hollerbach smilifase at gmail.com
Fri Dec 14 08:39:44 EST 2012


Saw this on MASSBIRD this morning. Hey, you never know.  It's a hop, skip and jump for an albatross to get to CT from there!

Jan Hollerbach

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Marshall Iliff <miliff at aol.com>
> Date: December 13, 2012, 11:00:01 PM EST
> To: Massbird <massbird at TheWorld.com>
> Subject: [MASSBIRD] Black-browed Albatross S of Martha's Vineyard
> Reply-To: Marshall Iliff <miliff at aol.com>
> 
> All,
> 
> I received a report from Rachel Farrell who reports the below from Brian Gervalis, who saw a Black-browed Albatross (clearly an adult of the nominate subspecies), off Massachusetts 9 December:
> 
> "I wanted to report a really interesting species I was able to see this weekend.  I was offshore on a research trip on Sunday about 50 miles SE of Pt. Judith.  We had a Black Browed Albatross around the boat looking for handouts with the rest of the gulls and gannets.  It was within 20 feet of the boat at its closest and hung around for a couple of hours.  We were able to get some great photos and I've attached a few.  I've spent a fair amount of time offshore up and down the coast over the last 12 years or so and this is my first albatross.  Really cool to see." 
> 
> 
> I posted Brian's three photos to Flickr so they can be seen by all:
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/29296826@N02/8271671036/in/photostream/
> 
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/29296826@N02/8270605547/in/photostream/
> 
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/29296826@N02/8271671228/in/photostream/
> 
> 
> 
> The ship's coordinates during the sighting were:
> 
> 40 52.8092 N, 070 43.0115 W.
> 
> The lat/long coordinates on Google are here:
> 
> http://maps.google.com/maps?q=40+52.8092+N,++070+43.0115+W&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=X&ei=yVi_UMu4BOPA0AGmv4DYCQ&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAA
> 
> Dick Ferren reports that this is about 4 miles east of the MA/RI line, so Rhode Island narrowly missed a first state record while Massachusetts got its third (and first photographed) one. There are still fewer than ten photo-documented records for the west Atlantic.
> 
> The two prior MARC accepted records can be seen by zooming in this map and clicking on the points to see the dates/locations: http://ebird.org/ebird/map/bkbalb?neg=true&_neg=on
> 
> In closing, I should say that in the past, some West Coast "chase trips" for albatrosses have succeeded in refinding these large birds even a few days or week after an initial sighting. they are *highly* responsive to chum (especially on windier days) and might be attracted from tens of miles around. If anyone has a chance, it would be worth trying to relocate this bird (easier said than done, logistically and practically).
> 
> Exciting news either way, and congratulations to Brian for his lucky find.
> 
> Best,
> 
> Marshall Iliff
> 
> -- 
> 
> ****************************
> Marshall J. Iliff
> miliff AT aol.com
> West Roxbury, MA
> ****************************
> eBird/AKN Project Leader
> www.ebird.org
> www.avianknowledge.net
> Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> Ithaca, NY
> ****************************



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