[CT Birds] Monk Parakeets Invasive

Kevin Burgio kevin.burgio at gmail.com
Wed Jan 9 22:31:42 EST 2013


Well, such a study would be possible and potentially informative.  However, in order for the results to support your hypothesis, you would need an appropriate sample size and replicates, and to account for other variables, such as climate, time of year, and etc.  The destruction of a large multi-chambered nest may have very different impacts in the winter than the summer and might be different in a place such as Florida rather than here. 

Secondly, you'd either have to wait until a storm to knocked down enough nests, which may have been the case with Sandy, or you'd have to physically knock them down and I doubt many people would be happy about someone doing that. To wait for a storm to hit, you'd have to know the location and size of each nest in the study area both before and after the storm as well as continue to monitor the study area for a great deal of time afterward.  And, honesty, that is just the tip of the iceberg and just off the top of my head.  More than likely, you'd also need to monitor individual birds over a period of time before and after to determine the impact the event had on their population numbers. 

So, yes, while it is possible that such a study could be done, it is beyond my ability at this time to do so, since I already have too many research projects going on at the moment to finish my Ph.D. in as timely manner as I (and my wife) would like.  I'd be more than happy to consult with anyone interested in pursuing it further though, even in a less rigorous manner than I would personally pursue it.

Kevin

On Jan 9, 2013, at 8:39 PM, "Sarah Faulkner" <sffaulkner at comcast.net> wrote:

> This discussion highlights the importance of good scientific investigation in wildlife management.  To eradicate or encourage a species, you need to understand their feeding, habitat and behavioral needs.  Monk parakeets are colonial birds, meaning they live and breed in colonies, sometimes large ones.   The prevailing theory about their colonies is that, by breaking up the colony, you cause the death of the birds.  Certainly the lack of birds in large numbers, following destruction of the nests, seems to support that theory.  So, maybe they're not like bittersweet or some other invasives, but rather like bees, where an essential element (the queen, or the critical mass of birds) is necessary to the health and existence of the whole colony.
> 
> Sarah Faulkner
> Collinsville, CT
> 
> essage ----- From: "Dan Rottino" <rottino at hotmail.com>
> To: <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Sent: Wednesday, January 09, 2013 7:50 PM
> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Monk Parakeets Invasive
> 
> 
>> Like many invasive species, Bittersweet comes to mind, if u don't root it all out, it only makes the problem worse.  Chopping down bittersweet only makes the roots sprout more shoots therefore multiplying the problem. I attended an invasive species workshop last May and this is exactly what happens With many invasives.  Roy's hypothesis is logical and can be tested/documented.  So Roy, that is the start of the scientific process. Your idea is a testable scientific hypothesis.  Evidence is needed.  The hypothesis can be supported by evidence or not in the end.  Kevin are you the one who can accomplish this task?  P. S.  I can occasionally monitor that nest if it would be helpful / I took a look at it today for example.
>> 
>> They've gotta be somewhere.
>> Dan Rottino
>> Sent from my iPhone.
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