[CT Birds] Stratford Point Stilt Sandpiper

Comins, Patrick PCOMINS at audubon.org
Fri Aug 12 19:07:31 EDT 2016


Correction, we were thinking probably Red not Red-necked Phalarope on those flybys on Tuesday.

Patrick Comins

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 11, 2016, at 7:48 PM, Comins, Patrick <PCOMINS at audubon.org<mailto:PCOMINS at audubon.org>> wrote:


I had a Stilt Sandpiper fly by at Stratford Point this afternoon.  I think it might be a new species for the Point list.   It flew by twice, once overhead calling with Short-billed Dowitchers, then flying around off the north beach in loose association with a Lesser Yellowlegs.   Unfortunately it flew off around the point.  Glad I got to hear the call yesterday so I recognized it!


Good numbers of Semipalmated Sandpipers with about 3,000, but they are very jumpy at high tide.  A falling tide seems to offer better opportunities for viewing and photography.  There was at least one White-rumped Sandpiper in the flock today.  Scott and I also had White-rumped Sandpiper and an fading adult Western Sandpiper on Tuesday evening.   We also had a small group of possible/probable Red-necked Phalaropes flying west offshore on Tuesday.   I was too busy trying to get more scopes on them to get a great look, but I think Scott saw more detail than I did.


Orchard Orioles continue to be regular at the Point and a few more migrant landbirds like Gray Catbird and Common Yellowthroat are starting to show up.


Patrick

Patrick M. Comins, Director of Bird Conservation, Audubon Connecticut
Phone: (203)405-9115

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