[CT Birds] Hopes Rise That Staten Island’s Young Eagle Is a Native New Yorker - The New York Times

Arthur Shippee ashippee at snet.net
Tue Sep 6 20:44:40 EDT 2016


Now that you're all home, resting up for tomorrow's exploits, some eagle news from the Big Apple -- Staten Island, of course.

> http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/06/nyregion/hopes-rise-that-staten-islands-young-eagle-is-a-native-new-yorker.html <http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/06/nyregion/hopes-rise-that-staten-islands-young-eagle-is-a-native-new-yorker.html>
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> Hopes Rise That Staten Island’s Young Eagle Is a Native New Yorker
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By JOE TREZZASEPT. 5, 2016
Continue reading the main story <http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/06/nyregion/hopes-rise-that-staten-islands-young-eagle-is-a-native-new-yorker.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fscience&action=click&contentCollection=science&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=4&pgtype=sectionfront&_r=0#story-continues-1>Share This Page
> Three years ago, as Lawrence Pugliares searched for bugs and butterflies to photograph within the Mount Loretto Unique Area <http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/8291.html>, a 200-acre grassland along the south shore of Staten Island, something not so tiny soared over his head. Mr. Pugliares scrambled as an adult male bald eagle canvassed what would become its new home.
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> “I had to change lenses and, of course, I missed him,” said Mr. Pugliares, 52, a stenography instructor who has taken thousands of photos of eagles. “But we met again and again and again.”
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> Once considered rare, bald eagles have become increasingly common along New York City’s waterways over the last few years. Seven to 10 of the birds are thought to live on Staten Island, including two adult eagles frequently found at several coastal parks in three neighborhoods.
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> Recently, a younger bird has been seen consistently with the two adults, leading many to believe that Staten Island’s bald eagles have achieved a milestone this summer.
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> If the juvenile bird hatched in that borough, it would represent the first bald eagle born in the city in more than 100 years, according to the New York City Audubon <http://www.nycaudubon.org/index.php>.
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> Birders say the juvenile’s behavior suggests it was born to that pair of adult eagles. Thick-billed but not yet white-headed, the young bird has been photographed taking food from the beaks of the older birds, something that is considered a sign of successful breeding.

.... rest of story on the site, with nice pictures.
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