[CT Birds] Red Bats

jaybrd49 at aol.com jaybrd49 at aol.com
Sun Jan 29 20:18:48 EST 2017




,A few thoughts on bats seen during a Connecticut winter:


.  Red bats, one of three "tree roosting" bats (the others being the Hoary and Silver-haired bats) are migratory, flying to the southeastern states in the fall where they presumably hibernate.   Although the red bat is more adapted to colder temperatures than other bat species, there is not much in the way of insects to would sustain them for long in Connecticut at this season.  There are a few early January records for this species in places like West Virginia, but I do not know about Connecticut. Another note about red bats - they will fly during daylight hours. 


The bat more likely to be seen in Connecticut at this time of year is the Big Brown Bat.  This species hibernates right here in Connecticut in old buildings, attics, barns, etc.  They can tolerate extremely cold temperatures while they are hibernating, but unfortunately, when disturbed from their winter slumber, they can awaken and be seen on the wing. In colder weather, they can use up the energy reserves, not a good thing to do when spring and a steady food source is still two months off.  This is similar to what happens to bats suffering from white-nose syndrome.  


Jay Kaplan
Canton



-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Williams via CTBirds <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
To: robert braunfield <rbraunfield at yahoo.com>; ctbirds <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
Sent: Sun, Jan 29, 2017 9:27 am
Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Red Bats

Interesting for me to find this as last Sunday a bat was flying when coming home the long way from birdcounting in Pachaug State Forest.  Are there other distinguishing characteristics other than the season to call one bat a red or not?  This location has bats more evenings than not through the year and I have found late fall and early spring activity (and vice-versa) in recent years so I thought nothing too unusual to see one in the January thaw, although I have read some that recent studies show the colony bats are more susceptible in hibernation lapses.     On Monday, January 23, 2017 12:15 PM, robert braunfield via CTBirds <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org> wrote:  The most likely bat to see on a warmish winter day is the Red Bat. While they migrate south in the autumn, there tend to be individuals around that come out during appropriately temperate days in the winter. I've seen them a few times on my Christmas counts. Robert Braunfield.  Hadlyme Sent from my iPhone_______________________________________________This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org   _______________________________________________This list is provided by the Connecticut Ornithological Association (COA) for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut.For subscription information visit http://lists.ctbirding.org/mailman/listinfo/ctbirds_lists.ctbirding.org




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