[CT Birds] Big Birder: Noah Strycker on Where to Spot Rare Species - The New York Times

Arthur Shippee ashippee at snet.net
Sat Apr 22 22:41:41 EDT 2017


To relax with after editing photos, or to give you hope before setting out for the day....

Selections from a fun short interview (read it all on the site!) -- had to include last item:  who knows what the next day will bring here?
> 
> https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/20/travel/noah-strycker-finding-rare-birds-species.html <https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/20/travel/noah-strycker-finding-rare-birds-species.html>
> 
> Big Birder: Noah Strycker on Where to Spot Rare Species
> By CHARU SURIAPRIL 20, 2017
> 
> In September 2015, Noah Strycker <https://noahstrycker.com/> entered the Guinness Book of World Records by besting a British couple, Ruth Miller and Alan Davies, who in 2008 tracked 4,341 species of birds in a year. Mr. Strycker tracked 6,042 species and told his story on the Audubon Society blog, Birding Without Borders <http://audubon.org/noah>.
> 
> Mr. Strycker, 31, has climbed trees around the globe in pursuit of birds like the red-billed starling or black-breasted thrush. His 40-liter backpack is filled with items fit for the die-hard outdoorsman, like Leica 10x42 Ultravid HD-Plus binoculars, malaria pills and water-purifying tablets.
> 
> Following are edited excerpts from an interview with him:
> 
> What’s the most adventurous thing you’ve done to spot a bird?
> 
> I’ve driven a Zodiac boat in Antarctica, crashed through leech-infested forests in India and stayed awake for nearly four straight days during the Norwegian summer solstice. In central Peru <http://travel.nytimes.com/travel/guides/central-and-south-america/peru/overview.html?inline=nyt-geo>, I got up at 2 one morning and drove up a desolate mountain. The road was so bad it ripped the rear bumper off our van and left us mired in mud with two flat tires and a dead battery in the middle of nowhere. But we saw a spectacular golden-backed mountain tanager, so the trip was worthwhile.
> 
> ....
> 
> What is the rarest bird you’ve spotted? And where?
> 
> In June 2016 in Ithaca, N.Y., I watched a brown pelican circle over the Cornell University campus. It was the first of its species ever spotted there, and local birders were going crazy with up-to-the-second text message reports; one guy saw it from the Ithaca farmers’ market, and an undergrad managed to run out of class in time to watch the pelican glide overhead. Sometimes the rarest birds show up in the most familiar of places.


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