[CT Birds] CTBirds Digest, Vol 3767, Issue 1

Robert Reginio robert.reginio at gmail.com
Wed Feb 21 20:41:28 EST 2018



Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 21, 2017, at 12:00 PM, ctbirds-request at lists.ctbirding.org wrote:
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> Today's Topics:
> 
>   1. Extralimital rarities (Frank Mantlik)
>   2. Bethlehem W-e Vireo, Wood Thrushes (greg hanisek)
>   3. Re: Wood Thrushes (Chris Elphick)
>   4. Tropical Storm Cindy -Frigatebirds (Frank Mantlik)
>   5. Colchester Deck (Ernest Harris)
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> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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> Message: 1
> Date: Tue, 20 Jun 2017 16:54:59 +0000 (UTC)
> From: Frank Mantlik <mantlik at sbcglobal.net>
> To: CT Birds <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Extralimital rarities
> Message-ID: <473365700.2500945.1497977699518 at mail.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
> 
> Regional rare birds of note recently:
> -YELLOW-NOSED ALBATROSS, photographed 6/18 on rock of Pond Island, (off Popham Beach), Maine. ??http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S37695893
> 
> -BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCKS (10) - 6/19. Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S37696876
> 
> -BROWN PELICAN - 6/20. Salisbury, Newburyport, MA.
> -FORK-TAILED FLYCATCHER - 6/18 &19. Cape May, NJ.
> NY, Long Island: ?ARCTIC TERN, Nickerson Beach 6/19.? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? FRANKLIN'S GULL, Northport 6/18.
> ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? BROWN BOOBY, Nickerson Beach a few days ago; now deceased.
> ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Many GREAT SHEARWATERS & other seabirds a few days ago.
> 
> BROWN BOOBY: Corbett's Pond, Windham, NH, for 1-2 weeks.
> HENSLOW'S SPARROW, Wallkill, NY for about 2 weeks.Photos I took on June 14 are here: ? ?http://www.flickr.com/photos/avocetfm/
> 
> 
> 
> Frank MantlikStratford
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 2
> Date: Tue, 20 Jun 2017 19:43:30 +0000 (UTC)
> From: greg hanisek <ctgregh at yahoo.com>
> To: CT Birds <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Bethlehem W-e Vireo, Wood Thrushes
> Message-ID: <21146067.2577030.1497987810251 at mail.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
> 
> This morning on Magnolia Hill Road, east of Hard Hill Road, a White-eyed Vireo was singing in typical scrubby habitat. ?Also along this c 0.8-mile stretch to the end of Magnolia were 3 Wood Thrushes and 3 Field Sparrows. Nice mix of habitats. Apropos recent posts about Wood Thrush, I drove home (slowly) threw good thrush areas in Bethlehem, Watertown and Middlebury, hearing 5 more Wood Thrushes from the car.?
> I've noticed in my regular haunts, especially with Wood Thrushes and Veerys, that either one can have a very good singing day while the other doesn't, and vice versa. I only had 2 Veerys today, and I know they're well-represented in the areas I covered. Consequently it's very hard to get a handle on their presence with one day's pass through an area. Of course anyone getting an impression from their neighborhood or on a frequently visited patch will have a better feel. Still, these populations have their yearly ups and downs. That why efforts like the SBCs (and diligent eBird entries over time) offer valuable information.?
> Greg HanisekWaterbury?
> 
> |  | Virus-free. www.avast.com  |
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 3
> Date: Tue, 20 Jun 2017 21:26:58 +0000 (UTC)
> From: Chris Elphick <elphick at sbcglobal.net>
> To: "ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org" <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: Re: [CT Birds] Wood Thrushes
> Message-ID: <1283844324.234406.1497994018842 at mail.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
> 
> As most people on ctbirds probably know, wood thrushes have been undergoing a long-term population decline in the state. That said, I would caution anyone from reading too much into the apparent changes at any given location, or even in any one year.? 
> 
> This link goes to an animated graphic that Chris Field (postdoc in my lab) made a few years ago using the Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data for the state:http://www.ctbirdtrends.org/woodthrush.html
> The graph on the right shows how the average wood thrush population has declined over the past 40 years.? (Note, if your internet is as slow as mine, you might need to wait a minute or two for the animation to load and for the graphs to show all the information they contain.) The graph on the left shows the actual data, with each bar representing the total count for a given BBS route.? The grey horizontal line shows the average population size in 1966 when the survey began, and the shifting blue line shows how that average changes from year to year (corresponding with the points in the graph on the right). 
> 
> If you look at how the bars for individual BBS routes bounce around in the left-hand graph you'll see dramatic shifts from year to year.? Averaged over all sites, however, the overall trend does go up and down some, but it follows a fairly steady (and far less dramatic) decline that at any individual site.? None of that up and down at individual sites is especially unusual for a songbird population, yet it is often what is most apparent to us during day-to-day birding, frequently exaggerating our impressions of how things are changing overall.? 
> 
> It is also my impression that we generally take more note of local absences of expected species than their reappearance .. this is certainly true for me ... I'll notice if my local Carolina wren or mockingbird disappears for a year, but I often don't pay nearly as much attention to their return a couple of years later.? Also, I think people are far more likely to post a message about an absence of local birds, than about their continued persistence (or return) - again possibly creating a misleading impression of how bad things are overall.
> Having said all that, I should emphasize that I do not mean to minimize the loss of species, even locally.? Serious regional/long-term declines always start with a series of local/short-term declines.? I just wanted to point out that fluctuating populations are normal, especially at a local scale, and that we really need to look through all that noise and find out what the bigger/broader signals are, so that we can focus our attention on those.
> 
> Chris
> 
> ?Chris Elphick @ssts 
> Storrs, CT 
> elphick at sbcglobal.net
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 4
> Date: Wed, 21 Jun 2017 07:34:56 -0400
> From: Frank Mantlik <mantlik at sbcglobal.net>
> To: Birds CT <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Tropical Storm Cindy -Frigatebirds
> Message-ID: <BC0DAB44-6A1D-4593-A13B-9015A3C7531E at sbcglobal.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain;    charset=us-ascii
> 
> Some CT birders may be aware of one (or two) MAGNIFICENT FRIGATEBIRDS that appeared in recent weeks off Cape Cod, MA, then along the southern coast of Maine (Prout's Neck).
> Well yesterday in LA, there was an eBird report of an accurate count (photos & video) of 800 MAGNIFICENT FRIGATEBIRDS along the Mississippi River near New Orleans. It would seem logical that this unusual concentration is a result of Tropical Storm Cindy, currently in the Gulf of Mexico.
> Check it out:
> 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S37714358
> 
> Something for CT birders to keep in mind as the storm eventually heads east and north.
> 
> Frank Mantlik
> Stratford
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 5
> Date: Wed, 21 Jun 2017 08:45:00 -0400
> From: Ernest Harris <pdlqlt at mac.com>
> To: CTBirdsDigest <ctbirds at lists.ctbirding.org>
> Subject: [CT Birds] Colchester Deck
> Message-ID: <D4FD676C-E464-4236-89C0-12E776A40EC5 at mac.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
> 
> 6/21/2017- Colchester Deck-Summer ,and a gloriously birdy morning: 4:15AM- Boisterous dawn chorus!; 5:45-6:45AM- 34 species including: vireos( YT&RE), Ruby-throated Hummingbird(m&f), Flycatchers( phoebe,pewee, great-crested), Scarlet Tanager, Chimney Swift, Cooper?s Hawk ( w. bird-prey), Louisiana Water Thrush, Blue-winged Warbler, Am. Redstart ( m feeding fledgling). Delightful!  Ernie
> 
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> End of CTBirds Digest, Vol 3767, Issue 1
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